New Forced Femme Video

Well, folks, I am getting into making little gender fluid videos now, and I just released a new one I think many of you will find very fun:  Stop Teasing Your Sister!   it’s about a bully of an older brother who mercilessly teases his younger sister when she hits puberty, particularly tormenting her by constantly snapping her bra strap.

His fed up mother eventually turns to a radical new form of therapy to turn her bad boy into a good girl.

You can find my channel here, and if you haven’t seen it be sure to check out the video for A Man Does What She Has to Do.

Please Like, Comment and Share!   I love to get feedback!!!

Meanwhile, I am working on a new gender fluid story for your pleasure, which should be coming out in early August.   It’s bound to be a gas!

Thanks, all, and please keep on being your gorgeous and amazing self!

 

 

New Forced Femme Video

Sam: Gender Fluid Movie

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Directed by Mel Brooks’ son, Nicholas Brooks, Sam tells the story of a sexist womanizer who wakes one day to find he has been turned into a pretty, petite woman with a voice, as he says, like a chipmunk.  How will he react?  What will life be like for a man like that who suddenly finds himself dealing with a sexist boss, who can’t go to a bar without getting hit on by sleezy guys?  Who is now small and pretty and has to look up at just about every adult he meets?

Most interesting to me– is biology destiny?  Will a straight man who disrespected women, given a straight woman’s body, find himself thinking like and wanting all the things that straight women want– or at least that society says they should want?  That is, will be become all about marriage and babies and wanting to be a wifey and a mommy?

The movie maker put some money and time into the film– it looks good, and features performances by some well-known and accomplished actors such as Morgan Fairchild, Stacey Keach and Brian Batt. Natalie Knepp is excellent as Sam in his female form, being able to play it butch without being cartoony.

The story, both in terms of the plot and tone, very much feels like an old-school Fictionmania story, with a distinct resemblance to a Spell R Us tale, right down to a mysterious wizardly character who turns on the magic to give our misogynistic male his own boobs.

Now, here is the thing.  It ends much better than it starts.  The early scenes go through beats you would expect in a story of this genre– the sexist male character making derogatory comments about women, hitting on women in the office, mocking his friend who is getting married to a “ball buster” and bonding with his sexist boss over the shared belief that the best part of a woman is her ass.  However, much of this early dialogue sounds unnatural, with strange turns of phrases and contrived scenes that all serve a purpose but which often seem forced.   I felt as I watched that the actors were struggling with commitment in some of these scenes, as they sounded more like they were reciting lines at a read through.

Then, the change happens.  The sex change, that is.  The early stages of the change are all you’ve seen it before moments– if you read a lot of this kind of TG Fiction– and they follow a pattern that is familiar in many stories but which have often struck me as a little absurd– these include the character trying to persuade his best bro that he has been turned into a woman, the character just being allowed to show up at his old job by claiming to be his own cousin– because, of course, every business will employ any random woman who comes along as long as she provides no proof she is related to an employee who has mysteriously vanished.

Of course, I understand why these scenes exist, and I am even willing to accept them as part of the genre, but there was not a lot of jazz to the scenes for me.  They just felt like perfunctory scenes, and I always want more tension, emotional stakes and even psychological realism.

Once all that is out of the way, though, I found myself liking the movie much more, and I feel it is very much worth watching once we get down to the business of this guy, now a girl, and how he responds to his new sex.   After initially dressing in masculine style clothes and doing nothing with his long hair, he decides that in order to be successful in as his new sex, he needs to learn how to dress and act like a girl.   Therefore, he hires a coach, Brian Batt, who teaches him to dress and act more ladylike.  Sam is clearly terrified of going down this path, even as he needs it, and tries to run away at the last minuite, then gets in a battle of wills with his fem coach, played by Brian Batt.  Batt is great, though the character is a stock gay character, and the scenes are fun as we see the sexist male slipping into a leotard, stockings, heels, and learning to do his makeup and to sit and gesture like a woman.

There is a seen where he expresses his bewilderment as his sex change, asking his friend, “How do you think I feel seeing this face in the mirror?  Hearing myself talking in this voice?”  I would have loved more of that– even in a comedy– but often he seems to be moving through the world as if the change has made very little difference.

The film hits its best moments when it morphs into a romantic comedy, with Sam, now called Samantha, falling in love with his best male friend.  He is shocked to realize it, and even makes a booty call, where he confesses that he is having lusty and romantic feelings for his bro, who freaks out at the thought.   And once Sam has allowed himself to luxuriate in the male musk of his friend he becomes obsessed with cuddling and then even begins to have a sudden new interest in what it would be like to have a baby.  In this film, he not only adapts to society’s expectations by dressing like a woman, but he starts to think and act as a traditional woman as well, experiencing all the needs and feelings.

Given the genre, it will be no surprise that our character is eventually given a choice– to stay as a woman or go back to being a man.   I won’t give away the ending.   I am glad I watched the film, and there are some fun, interesting scenes.  This film falls on the side of biology, suggesting that Sam, given ovaries, will become a straight woman.  For him, biology is destiny, and as long as he has a female shape he will be forced to accept a traditional female life of man, marriage and babies.  Or maybe he is just fulfilling his own sexist beliefs about what women want?

Now out on Itunes, Amazon, Vudu and everywhere!  Here is the Amazon Link:

Sam on Amazon

Official Website

 

Sam: Gender Fluid Movie

Slow Swap/Fast Swap

Pic is promo for my Hero series, in which NYC cops get body swapped into the bodies
of young strippers.

I know some readers love a slow, leisurely swap.  One day the character wakes up and notices he’s a little shorter.  Next, he finds that he can’t get a jar open.  He’s losing muscle.  Then, he pops a pair of little breasts, and his hips start to widen and round.  His voice slips to a higher register!  Eventually, he wakes up to find he has fully become a woman, and he runs to the bathroom to grab his girlfriend’s maxi-pads as he has his first period.

I tend toward the slow swap.  I find it more interesting and love to watch the character dealing with the gradual changes in their bodies and personalities as well as how the world treats them as they begin to read as female to those they meet. I love the internal conflict and exploring how different kinds of personalities react to their blossoming womanhood.

On the other hand, we have the sudden sex-change.  I feel these often take the form of swaps.  A poorly worded wish to a genie, and a bickering couple suddenly find themselves trapped in each other’s bodies.  A mad scientist builds a machine which switches minds and our hapless couple stops by their house looking for directions.   Now, Jim is Jane and Jane is Jim and they have to deal not only with their sex-change but the need to impersonate each other.

Or, as in the case of Thorne Smith’s Turnabout, a weird old statue swaps the couple into each other’s bodies and again they decide they need to live each other’s lives, with the guy becoming a stay at home housewife who ends up pregnant while his wife goes off to work.

These stories often explore radical changes not just to the character’s sex but also their identity.  Suddenly, a man is not only a woman, but a wife and how does he react when his big, strong wife starts pressuring him for sex?  Or, the sexist boss finds himself a busty little secretary, and all of a sudden his old buddies are hitting on him while he scurries around the office in his skirt and heels trying to figure out how to be a secretary and a woman in the workplace.

These are men who are usually forced to assume new roles and identities instantly, and the new roles are almost always, at least in their eyes, inferior to what they had as men.

In the case of the slow changes, there is the fun of watching as they slowly change and everyone around them knows it.  This isn’t a case where the guy wakes up as a cheerleader and has to try and fool everyone into thinking he’s Tiffany, the perky blonde who loves teddy bears!  This is the football stud who finds himself getting weaker and smaller, whose voice cracks as he’s calling plays and settles into a tea-kettle squeak like a little girl, who has to switch to showering in the girl’s locker room because his perfect D-cups are driving the boys crazy and who usually finally has to accept what is happening and ends up ruefully joining those giggly girls in their pleated skirts and tight sweaters, kicking and squealing for the team knowing that everyone in the stadium knows that he, the hot new girl, was the studly quarterback when the season started.

I feel they both have their pleasures.  They can both be great fun.  I tend to do more slow changes myself, but even as I write this I am thinking about some ideas for instant swaps and what could be really fun about them that I can’t do in a slow swap, which is, of course, mostly that sudden bucket of cold water to the face a straight, white male would experience to wake up to find he’d become one of THEM, and then when he realized he not only was in the body of that smoking hot piece of ass he’d slept with the night before, but that he now had to figure out how to live as a smoking hot piece of ass.

 

 

 

 

Slow Swap/Fast Swap

Rey is Darth Vader (Spoilers)

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Until the next movie comes out and clears up Rey’s origins, I am going to believe that Rey is Darth Vader reborn as a woman.

For those who haven’t seen the movie, stop reading now and go see it.  You really need to.

For those who have, here is my thinking:

Rey has many skills which she could not have learned as an abandoned child living as a scavenger on a wasteland of a planet.  She can pilot a space ship, for example, and when Finn asks her how she did it, she responds, “I don’t know.”

The answer?  Because she learned to pilot in her previous life. As DARTH VADER!

She also knows how to handle a light-saber.  She can fight with one so well, in fact, that she out duels the movie’s baddie, the leader of the Knight of Ren, Kylo Ren.  How could she be so good with a lightsaber without having ever held one before?

Because she learned to use one in her previous life as Darth Freaking Vader!

In addition to her Annakin Skywalker skillset, there are other scenes offering mysterious hints as to her origins.  Kylo Ren, when he tries to use to force to mind control her, senses a connection between them.  “Don’t be scared,” he says.  “I feel it, too.”  The nature of the connection is left vague, but my belief is that what he senses, and doesn’t yet realize, is that the young woman before him is none other than his grandfather, the man he idolizes and seeks to emulate.

Her fear of the light saber she once owned, her eventual claiming of same, the look of tragic sorrow in Luke’s eyes when they meet, a tragic sorrow informed by the fact that Luke knows she is his father– all of these things point Rey, whose name means “king” as Darth Vader.

How, then, could it have happened?  Rumors have been circulating for some time that Darth Plagueis, who had the power to create life, would appear in the next film.  There, it will be revealed that he brought Vader back to life in the shape of a female and hid him on Jakku to await the time when she could be called forth to embrace her heritage.

So, there you have it.  Rey is Darth Vader.   I’m not the only one who thinks so, by the way.   Check out this link: Vader is Chick Now

Okay.  Now, the truth is, I am sure this is all wishful thinking on my part.  I look for TG stuff everywhere!   In fact, my first thought was that she was Obi Wan Kenobi, given her accent.   I only switched it up because we hear Obi Wan speak to her during her vision and say, “Rey, you have taken your first step.”

In fact, I doubt the creators would want to muddle the story by introducing gender fluid elements into the film, or risk backlash from all the people rightfully praising Rey for being such a great character who happens to be female.   Were it suddenly revealed that she was once a man, that might be perceived as undermining her value as a role model.

However, I can assure you that when I went to watch the movie a second time, I pretended it was Darth Vader saying, “Why are you holding my hand?” as Finn tried to make him into a damsel in distress, and it was a lot of fun!

So, even if she doesn’t turn out to be he, go watch it again and pretend.  Everything is more interesting if you give it a gender fluid subtext!

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Rey is Darth Vader (Spoilers)

Tangerine: Spoilers

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The film Tangerine explores the lives of two transgender friends living in Los Angeles, features transgender performers in the lead roles, and explores and celebrates their lives and struggles without ever being self-consciously a statement about transgender issues.

What I mean is that this film is a film about people.   And in the same way a similar movie might have been about two friends who happened to be straight, or two friends who happened to be doctors, or any two people who happened to be other things, this one explores the lives of two people who happen to be TG, but who are not limited by that aspect of their identities, and who are neither valorized or mocked because of it.  There is no sense that the audience has any obligation to pay special attention to the fact that they are TG, or to view the film like a movie in a sociology class where the subtext is, “This is how TG people put on their shoes!”   They are people like other people, and that is among the film’s triumphs.

And what do these people want?  The same things as everyone else: they want to be valued, loved, understood, and it is their pursuit of these universal human needs to drives the drama of the film and almost brought me to tears on several occasions.

Alexandra has planned a big concert and invited all of her friends as well as everyone else in the neighborhood.  She loves to sing and hopes for a special evening sharing her love with her friends, who have all enthusiastically promised to come see her.   When she gets to the venue, not even one person has shown up, and she stands outside arguing with the manager, insisting that people are on the way, refusing to believe that not even a single person cared enough to make it to the show.  I ached for her both because she had been abandoned, and because she refused to believe she had been abandoned.  I know that feeling.   When I was a kid, the last time my mother tried to throw a birthday party for me no one came.  No one.   And I could see the pain and shame she felt as much as I felt my own.  I didn’t even realize no one liked me until I was sitting there in our dirty little house, watching my mother calling neighbors and listening to their excuses.  I know that feeling and experience is shared by many people who are not “normal.”

Finally, one person does show up, Sin-Dee, who has brought along a woman she is kidnapping–  see the movie– and Alexandra performs for her friend and the other lonely people who spend their Christmas Eves at seedy bars.

Sin-Dee is the more temperamental of the two, and her quest on this Christmas Eve has been to find the woman who has been sleeping with her boyfriend and confront them.   During this confrontation, she learns that her boyfriend has cheated on her not only with the one girl, but also with her best friend, Alexandra, whose concert she alone cared enough to see.

The second betrayal breaks her heart.   She is devastated, and she wanders off into the night to turn some tricks, looking for some way to get out of herself, to stop feeling what she is feeling, only to have a car full of frat boys throw a bottle of piss in her face.

The movie does, in scenes like the one above, show some of the abusive behavior with a transgender person might face, some of the disgusting acts that happen.  These women are as far from Kaitlin Jenner and the Victoria’s Secret fashion show as you can get, and their lives are full of hardships, not magazine covers celebrating them for their courage.

So, when Sin-Dee is horrified, despairing, broken, who comes to the rescue?  Alexandra.   She comes over and helps her friend, and the two of them at least have each other.  They are not along on Christmas Eve, and they are not defeated.   They each seem determined to keep on living, to get up and make it another day.

There is a third character searching for connection in the movie, an Armenian cab driver.  He is married and has a child, and he loves men, and particularly Sin-Dee.   The last we see of him he is alone in his living room, standing in front of a Christmas tree, with a lost and lonely look on his face as he faces maintaining his marriage, keeping up his obligations, continuing to live in the closet.  How much worse to be alone in the presence of others?  To be a stranger to yourself?

The film could, I suppose, be accused of typing transgender characters in the sense that they are sex workers.  One of the criticism of the portrayal of TG people in the past is that they tend to be criminals or prostitutes, drug addicts.

But, see the movie. It doesn’t have that feel of otherness about it.  In fact, it brings attentions to harsh realities:

Ms. Taylor (Alexandra) now finds herself in a position similar to Ms. Cox, (Orange is the New Black) as a spokeswoman for transgender people, appreciative of the increased visibility yet dismayed at the soaring rates of homicide, suicide attempts and unemployment that plague this world. “Visibility is very important, but it’s not changing the day-to-day lives of everyday trans people,” Ms. Cox said. “We need another culture shift.”

They are people.  They may be poor. They may be TG.  They may be or do a lot of things good and bad– but what we see in this movie is that they are people who just want to be loved and live their lives, and that is a wonderful thing to see.

It’s available for streaming!  Tangerine On Netflix

 

 

 

 

Tangerine: Spoilers