Interview: TG Trinity

It’s been a little while since I published an interview, so I am extra excited to being you this interview with TGTrinity, a writer and comic creator who has recently begun publishing work on TG Comics and Stories.  Check it out for thoughts and experiences in the world of TG art:

 

1. Talk about your interest in creating TG fiction and comics.

I’ve been fascinated with gender transformations for as long as I can remember, and that coupled with my overactive imagination led me to where I am now.

I wrote my first TG Comic while I was in High School, and it was about a group of men who volunteered to undergo a procedure to become more powerful. Of course something went wrong with the operation, and all five came out as powerful women. Even at that age I wanted to explore how men would react in such a way, but my teenage sex-addled mind would often lead them into the bed of a man. While anyone who has read my stories or my newer comics can attest to the fact that sex is a big part of my stories, it’s still the change that fascinates me.

The reason why I began publishing my own stories is because I saw a niche that wasn’t being filled. It seemed that every story was about a crazy wizard, and only a few stories actually tried to deliver an interesting take on gender change. I wanted a good mystery, with characters who faced conflict and situations that were less black and white. This led to “Timber Grove”, and the rest is history.

The interesting thing about my work in the TG genre is the fact that my older brother recently told my family that she is taking hormone therapy to live out the rest of her life as a woman. She has absolutely no idea that I write about transgendered transformations, as we’ve grown apart long before she announced her intentions. I don’t know if I’ll ever be able to talk to her about what it is I do, but the situation has greatly changed how I look at what I do.

2. You have a series, TimberGrove, and also do stand alone stories. How does the experience of writing a series versus a stand alone differ for you?

Well, the simple answer is that writing for a series takes a lot of work, while stand alone stories are really nice palate cleanser. With a series there are a lot of moving pieces and plots going on, and I’ve had readers point out loopholes big enough to drive a truck through. In fact, writing Timber Grove stories once felt more like work than a hobby, but I think that I’ve matured as a writer and plan my stories more to avoid the pitfall of getting lost in my own words. Stand alone stories on the other hand are a joy to write. It’s refreshing to sit down in front of my monitor and write without worrying about something I wrote 20,000 words ago.

3. What are some of your favorite TG works in terms of movies. books…etc… and why do they stand out to you?

Obvious answer, but I simply adore Transparent right now. My love of Jeffrey Tambor dates back to Arrested Development, but his portrayal of Maura is simply mind blowing. Also, the fact that they show that transgendered people are just as human as everyone else (and can be just as petty and dumb) is refreshing.

My favorite work among our little community online would definitely be Cblack’s “A Tangled Web”. This comic handles love, loss and lust in a masterful way, and the design of the characters is simply perfect.

4. What was it like the first time you put your work out into the world? I was very nervous myself.

I’m not going to lie, it was a harrowing experience. I didn’t have the nerve to ask someone to proofread what I had (and I used to drive my editors crazy with my lose grasp of proper sentence structure) so I uploaded my work to Fictionmania and sat by computer waiting for it to post. I then did the incredibly cliched thing were I spent the next day hitting refresh on my browser to see if someone would leave a review, because I had never received any feedback about my stories before.

Not my proudest moment, but it got easier with each new story.

5. Tell us about your upcoming projects.

Since I’ve made the jump to comics, I’m taking my time to gather up the right digital content before I work on longer entires. It’s a very costly endeavor, but I’m happy with the early support I’ve received on Patreon and the chance to work on some smaller comics. My hope in the future is to bring Timber Grove to life, but I’m going to need a lot more content to make that dream a reality.

That being said, I’m working on a longer comic called “Popular” that deals with a college student becoming a woman and her slow transformation from perky to ruthless. It’s an interesting endeavor, because my limited access to rendered environments and figures is forcing me to really rethink how I present a story. What was once a sprawling epic is now a story told entirely in one bedroom, and directly to the audience through a “webcam”. It’s a change, but I’m having a lot of fun with it.

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Check out TGTrinity’s website for more great artwork!

http://www.tgtrinity.com/

Interview: TG Trinity

Kitty Pride and Professor (really) X (Spoilers!)

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So, do you remember the time Professor X tried to do it with the teen-age Kitty Pride, but it wasn’t Kitty Pride but actually Baron Karza, the supreme enemy of the Micronauts?

The subplot, featured in the 4 issue x-Men and the Micronauts mini-series, flirted with Sub/Dom TG.    Baron Karza, trapped in the body of a female and dressed like a slave girl, on his back in such a vulnerable position, his arch-enemy, dominant, ready to make his move.  In the book, realizing his enemy intends to have sex with him, Karza tries desperately to distract his enemy, to keep him busy, because Karza feels physically helpess and unable to defend himself.

To understand the dynamic Chris Claremont was playing with, understand that Baron Karza was the Darth Vader of the micro-verse, the ultimate bad guy.  Like Vader, he always wore armor and a helemt, a cold, distant figure, inscrutable.  He ruled over others, had an near-omnipotence in his realm, and could even take on the form of a centaur, cementing his status as an emblem of masculinity and virility..

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So, for him to find himself trapped in the body of a girl, helpless and in the clutches of a predatory male was as close to a total reversal as could be imagined.

The added level of kind of strange pervyness was that the villain is actually Professor Xavier, and, of course, Kitty Pride was one of his students.  The story line didn’t really delve too much into this, and there were never any ramifications beyond the mini-series, but it was a very interesting, human and flawed Xavier that emerged.

A third little bonus for me was the fact that I had owned many micronauts as a kid and loved them, so now one of my favorite toys had merged with TG fiction, and I was in heaven.

In any case, these kinds of role-changes are very interesting to me.  Karza very quickly chose to play the helpless maiden, seeking to flatter and cajole and manipulate the man who wanted to have sex with him, all his usual shouting and bravado gone.  Yet, he was still Karza, and he was just waiting for the chance to try and kill his enemy.

How much of femininity is simply practicality?  Would any intelligent man, placed in Karza’s situation, resort to passive, feminine strategies?  Would many women, if they were bigger and stronger than the men in their lives, take on the dominant role because they could?

These are the questions I feel we can explore in genderfluid fiction, readily and overtly.  Of course, Chris Clarement, author of the series, didn’t have the freedom to pursue the story line very far or very deep.  The most he could do was play at the surfaces.   But that doesn’t mean, and I am sure others, haven’t written fan fiction in which Baron Karza remains a teen-age girl, and where he comes to find the pleasure in surrender.

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Kitty Pride and Professor (really) X (Spoilers!)

TG in 3D: Alien Worlds (spoilers)

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Is what’s inside the true measure of a man?

Brick, a chauvinistic alpha male, asks this question just before revealing his new, pin-up girl body, with huge, gravity defying breasts, to his girlfriend, Connie.  And it is a first rate pin-up girl body, drawn by one of the masters of the form, Art Adams.  And those breasts are in 3-D, thrusting right off the page and right at the reader.

The girl he’d become– one of the most erotic images I had ever seen– a true fantasy girl in every way– blew my mind.  If you have seen Art Adam’s work, you know he loves the female form, and he draws erotic, idealized visions of femininity that surpass anything you will ever see in the real world.  The man who now found himself with those full, firm breasts and those slender, round arms was a tough, domineering, strong man who was all about the macho lifestyle, and now here he was in a physical form that embodied everything he had felt superior to before his change.

I think this was the first time I had seen a TG comic with nudity, a man as a bare-breasted woman, and that was part of the allure as well.   There he stood before the woman who loved him, now prettier and more generously endowed than she was.  I imagined the shame, the humiliation, the despair he must have felt to have his women see him as a female for the first time.

So, back to the question: Is what’s inside the true measure of a man?

The comic answers in a single panel as we see Brick, the former alpha male, wearing a pair of Daisy Dukes and cleaning laundry in a pond.  Connie, returning from a successful hunting trip, a rifle in one hand, calls out, “Better Hurry Up, Hun.”

“Yes, dear,”  Brick answers.  “Whatever you say, dear.”

The alpha male, now the prettier, curvier of the two, has become the fem in the relationship, and his formerly girly-girly girlfriend has become the dominant partner.  She has the rifle, she does the hunting.  He is in the traditional role of the wife.  The man with the bigger breasts has become the woman.  What’s inside has changed to match his new shape.

It may have been my juvenile state at the time, or maybe it is my still juvenile state as of today, but those breasts haunted me, the idea that those amazing breasts belonged to a man, and what it seemed like they had done to him.  I just felt like having those big, perfect breasts had stripped away his manhood, though I now would have to think there were other parts of his body that he lost that would have had an equal or bigger impact.  In any case, it seemed to me that it was the body that changed him.

In my own writings that have featured characters like Brick I have played with a different idea, though, than merely the idea that a perfect, sexy little pin-up girl body would turn a chauvinist into a pin-up girl personality.  My feeling has been that a chauvinist could become the victim of his own biases, and that he would turn himself into a submissive female, giggling and pleasing and all those things because he would believe that was all he could be given his new sex and shape. Perhaps it would not be a case of biology is destiny, but bias is destiny.

Check It Out at Mile High Comics

TG in 3D: Alien Worlds (spoilers)