Talking about Tom Tame

BACKSPACE by [Tame, Tom]Pinsedo by [Tame, Tom]

 

An elderly billionaire finds himself trapped in the body of a beautiful young Caribbean girl, living and working as his wife’s maid.

A man allows himself to be feminized in order to pass as a woman and infiltrate a mysterious and diabolical mega-corporation.

A couple is cursed by a witch on Halloween, so that each time they have sex the man becomes more feminine.

These plot lines come from the books of one of my favorite TG authors, Tom Tame.

What I like about Tame’s books first and foremost is that they are always plot-driven. These are stories in which TG is a major element, but they are stories where the characters have goals, conflicts, developed personalities, and in which the stories advance and progress which each scene.

They all explore gender and identity.  The characters struggle with what is happening to them and what it means about who they are and how they fit into the world, and the people around them struggle with the changes as well.

In Little Brown Girl, for example, the main character is a very rich and powerful alpha male type who not only finds himself suddenly female, but a penniless female totally dependent on his ex-wife, and powerless to stand up to her when she pushes him into serving her as her maid.  The books very patiently explores how his new sex and newly disenfranchised state impact him mentally, as he finds himself browbeaten by people who he used to believe were beneath him.  The physical change is very fast, but the mental changes come very slowly as he struggles against biology and society.

In Pinsedo, where the private investigator agrees to be feminized, we see a similar exploration of identity as the main character sinks deeper and deeper into his role, and the man who was once pretending to be a woman more and more becomes the act.  It’s an interesting exploration of how the masks we wear come become our faces, and of course a thrill to watch as he begins to find himself thinking like and having the same needs as the young female he pretends to be.

And then Femmer is a wholly different story altogether, and the variety of Tame’s work also interests me as I don’t feel like I am reading the same story over and over again, but different stories with different characters experiencing the results of gender changes.  In Femmer, one of the intriguing things is the way the male character becomes trapped not only in a female shape, but trapped by his own ultra feminine passivity.

That’s a quick survey of a few of Tame’s works, which can be found at Amazon and elsewhere.  My only complaint with this author is that I want more!   Get typing, Tom Tame!  The world needs your stories!

Tom Tame on Amazon

Check out his blog!

 

 

New Book Now Available!

The new book, The Men Who Would Be Queen, is up!  Check it out on LULU:

http://www.lulu.com/shop/tg-cooper/the-men-who-would-be-queen-book-one/ebook/product-22849694.html

Or, Amazon!

See a free sample below!

US

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01LG310WQ#nav-subnav

UK

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01LG310WQ

Germany

https://www.amazon.de/dp/B01LG310WQ

France

https://www.amazon.fr/dp/B01LG310WQ

Japan

https://www.amazon.co.jp/dp/B01LG310WQ

Canada

https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B01LG310WQ

Australia

https://www.amazon.com.au/dp/B01LG310WQ

India

https://www.amazon.in/dp/B01LG310WQ

 

Let Me Bring Your Dreams To Life!

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Hey, folks.  I want to bring your dreams to life!  Seriously.  I have recently had the pleasure of creating three different stories on commission, and I have enjoyed the experience so much that I have decided to make commissioned stories a regular part of my writing practice.

Do you have certain dreams or fantasies you would love to see brought to life in the form of a short story or novella?  A plot you would love to see explored? Please allow me!

Here’s how it would work.  You would sketch out the plot and characters as well as the preferred length.  This can be as detailed or as abstract as you prefer.  One of my collaborators wrote down a plot point by plot point synopsis with very specific scene requests.  Another just offered a couple sentences.  Both projects were a blast and turned out great!

Once I understand what you are looking for, I would then write out the story and send it to you for your thoughts, feedback and/or approval.  I would then revise as necessary based on any additional ideas or requests you have, and then you would have your story.

Right now, I would charge 5 cents a word and request the rights to distribute the story with you sharing in the author credit.  If you prefer to remain anonymous or would like a story just for your private enjoyment, we can work that out as well.

Now, my specialty is, of course, stories exploring gender identity in which characters experience sex-changes of various kinds. I am only interested right in writing stories that fall into the TG or genderfluid category.  I do have some things I am reluctant or unwilling to write about in this realm, but if you have any thoughts or ideas message me.  I will entertain your pitch without judgement.  I will only decline story ideas if I feel I am not going to be able to enthusiastically and passionately bring your vision to life!

Hope to hear from you! redbankmick@aol.com

Check out my stuff on Amazon!

Cooper

Do you want muscle?

esther

So, I found myself considering a proposal to create something new: an illustrated TG story.

SteeleBlazer, proprietor of the fantastic Mighty Female Muscle Comix website, who also maintains an excellent site on Deviant Art, started it off with an email proposing that we collaborate.  He wanted us to create a story together, working out the details of the plot and characters, and he would offer suggestions and tweaks and edits, then add pictures.  I thought– hell no.

My reaction had nothing to do with SteeleBlazer.  I had a previous unpleasant experience with a potential collaborator that made me very reluctant to even think about working with someone.

Besides, I enjoyed the autonomy writing and self-publishing my books gave me. I wrote what I wanted, how I wanted, when I wanted.  Why change that?

And yet, the idea intrigued me, and I thought – maybe it is time?  Maybe I should give this another chance?  So I sent an email, and the two of us laid out some things and got some clarity established as to how this project would work.  Between my previous unpleasant experience and my discussions with SteeleBlazer I had read Twyla Tharp’s book about collaboration, and I had realized that for it to work there needed to be clear understanding of how we would work together before either of us committed.  We established that, and then….

Disaster! The worst experience of my life!

Not really!  Actually, I have had one of the best creative experiences of my life, and I am so happy we worked together and created a really special project which I think is going to be called Lift Like A Girl.

It takes place in a small town in Iowa, and follows the lives of some typical high-school kids as something strange begins to happen:  the girls all start to get really big and strong, while the boys struggle to maintain muscle and find themselves getting smaller.

For both SteeleBlazer and I, the story is very much about what happens to the minds of the characters as their bodies change, and the ways it impacts how characters see themselves and interact with others as males become the weaker sex.  It explores how high-school dynamics might change in such a world, and it was loads of fun to create!  We look at the changes from a variety of perspectives.  Esther, seen above, is a mousy intellectual nerd with a crush on a star athlete.  Mallory is a pretty, popular girl who is all about fashion and trends:

mallory

And Kat is a gloomy goth-chick:

Kat.png

We also see the world through the eyes of Derek, the stud jock Alpha Male of the school and Jack, a member of the swim team.

This story is a true collaboration, and I feel a seamless melding of our respective visions to create something that is certainly different from anything I have written before in a variety of sometimes nuanced ways.  I don’t want to give away too much away, but I had so much fun writing this, and I have to say that even days after completing the story I can’t stop thinking about these characters as they pop up in my dreams, while I am driving, eating… all the time!

It’ll be available soon!

 

5 Questions with Donald Allen Kirch

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Hey, folks!  I am so happy to share with you my interview with Donald Allen Kirch, author of the recently released TG horror novel Drop Dead Gorgeous, as well as the TG classic The Misadventures of Ka-Ron the Knight, one of my all time favorite TG works.

Enjoy!

1. What are your top three TG experiences in terms of books, films, videos, songs?

I kind ‘a fell into “TG” fiction. I loved the movie “Just One of the Guys” and “Switch” when I was younger. I have always found the “possibilities” of this genre fascinating.

2. One of the things I admired about Ka-Ron was that you created a very detailed and fascinating fantasy world of your own in which to place the TG adventures of Ka-Ron. Can you talk about the world building process and why the details of the world were important to Ka-Ron’s story?

First and foremost, if the background of a story is not believable, neither will the front story. I created the “Ka-Ron” universe to be taken seriously. I hoped that it would be seen as a serious fantasy story. The “TG” element was added later on. Most stories which take this route, the main character deserves what happens to him. Ka-Ron, on the other hand, is an innocent. He is an honorable man. The story of the love that grew between Jatel and him/her would never have worked if their world was not believable. My favorite part of the Ka-Ron universe was the creation of “My Dwarfs.” Unlike any other fantasy, Dorian was a class act. The wizards and wicca masters, the steampunk quality of the Argo, and even mixing horror with science fiction – all of it was just plain fun to create. I love these characters. They are like family to me.

In creating this world, I took the best and most tragic memories of my own life and incorporated them into the story. I have a “game” I like to play when writing: I, honestly, place myself into each story I write. In other words: One of the characters in Ka-Ron’s world is “me” – in mind, body, and spirit. In this case: Jatel. If anyone who has ever read this story were to meet me, they would say, “Hey! You remind me of Jatel.” Don’t know what I would do if I woke up as the “female” version of Jatel, but it would be fun trying to find out.

3. In both Ka-Ron and your latest, Drop Dead Gorgeous, the men are turned into women as a punishment. Can you discuss why the themes of forced sex-change and revenge interest you as a writer?

There is nothing more frightening that losing one’s identity. These two characters are normal men doing their parts in the world they are both comfortable with. Then, BAM! They wake to discover they have brand new bodies and that everything they know, have been taught, and understand about the universe…is gone. Scary stuff.

I also am a sucker for the “fish out of water” story. You’ve probably heard this said before, “If I had boobs I’d never leave the house.” Guys say that with a confident chuckle. What would they really do if they woke to a 38-24-36 body? They’d scream themselves into a coma. Their understanding of the world would be gone. It’s within that frightening fear that I like to walk.

4. Can you talk about your journey as a writer? What was the process like for you in terms of reaching the point where you felt ready to put your work out there for the world to see?

Writing is a cruel taskmaster. It’s demanding, lonely, and fantastically fulfilling. It takes great courage to expose your work. I have been writing since I was 13. Each story is a complete journey, and I learn so much about myself upon completion. However, I was quite shy when I first started doing this. It took a great deal of soul searching for publishing my first book. One bit of advice I can give to any writer starting out: Always remember – no matter how good your work is, there will always be that “one” who will gain great pleasure out of trying to bring you down. Whether it be the local “Grammar Nazi” or critic…you cannot please everyone. Learn to ignore what people say, and accept praise with honest humility. Most important: Never take “No” for an answer. Learn to accept rejection as a learning experience, and move onward to the next publisher, agent, or editor.

5. What has been the most positive aspect of publishing your work?

I’ve learned so much about who I am. Before “The Misadventures of Ka-Ron the Knight” I barely understood what “TG” was. As I have moved forward with this adventure, I have come to admire the courage and pioneering spirit of these brave people, and I hope that I have created heroes for them to embrace. Friends have come forward, informing me that I gave them the courage to stand tall and make their personal choice to go forward with their transition. That it was the acceptance of Ka-Ron and Jatel, when each went through their adventures; and that it was love which saved them both – these stories helped them say “Yes.” I am happy with who I am and where I stand in my life. If, however, I awoke within Jatel’s female body…after a few hours of heavy meltdown…well…I could live with it.

6. What’s coming up next? Let’s hear about your next projects!

I am working on a second book in the “DROP DEAD GEOGEOUS” series. An audio book will be coming out for DDG later this year. Keep in mind, “DROP DEAD GORGEOUS” is a horror novel. It is filled with gore and some disturbing scenes. Not at all like “Ka-Ron.” Speaking of Ka-Ron, the rights of the first trilogy revert back to me at the end of 2017. I plan to see if I can republish in the States. I am also finishing up a prequel trilogy in Ka-Ron’s universe which follows the heroic adventures and tragic downfall of Count Voslow. Next to Dorian, the Count is one of my favorite characters. I have at least four novels I am currently researching. I am always looking for a great story to tell.

I hope to meet all of you, one day. Perhaps, we can meet, plan a quest, learn a little about each other, and fulfill a quest on our way to Mull Garden.

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You can find links to all of Donald’s books on his homepage where you can also buy his books from a variety of sources and in a variety of formats.

Thanks, Donald, for a great interview!

New Book

promo

 

This time, I want to tell the story of a gender swap from a woman’s perspective.

That’s the idea I came up with to get started on my newest ebook.  I have written a lot of genderfluid books in the past couple years– more than 1000 pages worth, and I am always striving to find ways to challenge myself to write something different from what I’ve done before.

This time, I decided to do a first person account of a husband and wife who switch genders all told from the first person perspective of the wife as her husband gradually turns into a gorgeous little female and she turns into a tall, muscular male.

I think it will be a lot of fun as most of my books have always focused on the male experience of being swapped into a female body or gradually changed into a woman.   This time, I will focus just as much on how the woman feels about her own transformation as well as the conflict she feels as the big, strong man she married blossoms breasts and becomes smaller, weaker and more vulnerable, now looking to her for protection.

Once I had the idea for the perspective, other parts just started to occur to me.  I dreamed of the couple trapped on a desert island, and once that happened I knew I would have to write a classic TG story with my own twists and turns.  I began to see scenes from the story, including what will likely be the opening scene.  It’s all coming to me now as I work, drive, sleep, and so now the story has to be written because I know that until I do write it I won’t be able to stop thinking about it.

I haven’t seen the end yet, but I am excited and curious to see where these characters take me.  I am excited for them, to see what they discover about themselves and how they deal with their changing bodies and challenging new environment.  It will be fun.  It always is, and the biggest challenge for me now is to just let the characters and the story take me where they want to go, to resist the urge to make it happen in a different way than what has to happen.

Here I am.  At the start.  Let’s see where we go!

 

5 Questions with Lyka Bloom

lykabloom

Hey, readers!  Today I am extremely happy to share with you my interview with one of my favorite TG writers, Lyka Bloom!

 

  1. What are your top three TG experiences in terms of books, films, videos, songs?

It’s hard to remember now where the interest came from.  I was always fascinated by mental and physical manipulation of one form or another.  There’s a Clive Barker story called The Madonna Pool that was one of the first memories I have of reading gender transformation and really responding to it.  For some reason, Saturday morning cartoons seemed to be littered with gender change storylines, and I always found those viscerally attractive to me.  I know I am being vague, but it’s hard to point to a single thing, or even three things, that were formative.  Lately, I can point to certain books others have done.  I loved Pinsedo by Tom Tame, and I thought Allmyth was really wonderful, too.

  1. Why does the theme of TG interest you as an artist?

I think like science fiction at its best, the TG world allows you to do morality plays and also examine a real issue beneath the obvious real-world TG issues.  You can do crime-and-punishment stories in a way that has a sexy edge, and who doesn’t like a little sexiness in their lives?

Also, the idea of becoming something that you were not before appeals to me.  I think there’s a long-standing taboo regarding men expressing femininity, so I like to play with those ideas.  For some of my characters, the idea is repulsive while others hurtle towards it.  Sometimes it is a punishment, but that leads to the idea of how you can punish someone who is no longer the person they were.  I think my work tends to be a softer branch of the genre, where I introduce some optimism amid the changing bodies and minds.

We live in a time now when gender fluidity is more acceptable, and playing with the variations of the masculine and feminine, whether that’s shemale or futa or what have you, is fun as a writer.  You can explore the notion of attraction – what’s sexy now?  Is it the buxom woman or the slender man, is it the muscular, tall woman or the man with long hair and a hint of makeup?   Honestly, one of the biggest challenges is keeping up with how culture is changing.  As much bigotry and sexism exists, there is a surprising acceptance and tolerance for LGBT issues, and that’s really refreshing to see.  I think more people are open to the kinds of work I do and other authors in the genre do.  It’s come out of the closet, so to speak.

  1. TG fiction is very category driven.  What types of TG fiction are you most drawn to writing?  Why?

I really like the magical and mythological TG fiction.  I’ve always been attracted to the discordance in the male mind in the feminine body and so forth, so much of my fiction has to do with the man being conditioned into womanhood.  There’s an element of reluctance to it, but I don’t generally do humiliation in the stories, which is a theme I see running through a lot of the TG fiction.  I suppose I’m enough of a romantic to want a happy ending for most of my characters.  Even if they are fundamentally changed by the end of the story, the characters tend to be left happy.

I’m intrigued by the humiliation/sissy stories, but I’ve never been able to successfully write one.  Halfway through, I end up finding a way to make the characters find the upside in things. Sometimes I wish I was crueler, because some of that work is fantastic!  Ann Michelle, in particular, I enjoy for her feminization stories, and Kylie Gable does fantastic stuff there, too.

For me, I like to be more Cinemax than XXX, though I do like to get naughtier now and then but I think real affection between the characters finds its way in, whether I want it to or not.

  1. Can you talk about your journey as an artist?  Who were your influences? What was the process like for you in terms of reaching the point where you felt ready to put your work out there for the world to see?

My mainstream influences were Stephen King and Clive Barker, because I loved horror novels for most of my childhood.  I think King, in particular, has an eye for subtle detail that really grounds the stories of the fantastic in reality, and I still love that.  I try to do a hint of that in my work, but only a reader can say if I have any success in that arena.

I’ve written in one form or another for years and years, but I think the moment when I was ready to publish my work came when I was reading some of the stories available in this genre.  Yes, I’m a fan, too.  Without being overly critical, it really was a case of reading something and thinking I could do better, or at least no worse.  And then I read some truly impressive pieces and I realized that, yes, there is an element of the erotic in these stories, but there’s also real work being done to make interesting characters and to explore the nature of gender identity and sexual identity.  I put out a couple of stories to see if anyone was interested and they did quite well.  That really gave me the confidence to start producing more, and to play with expectations a little, too.  While the vast majority of my work is in the TG realm, I step outside of it to do some other things, including some horror erotica that is definitely influenced by my early reading.

What has surprised me most about starting and having been writing in this genre for several years now is the loyalty of the readers and the creativity that they express, too.  I started a Patreon thing so that readers could contribute and, in exchange, I would develop as try based around their ideas.  So, stories like the “Muffy the Demon Slayer” tale and “Casino of Change” are ideas that came from readers (I hesitate to call them fans, it sounds immodest to me) who were kind enough to offer a contribution in exchange for entrusting me with a story they would like to see.  It’s really fired my imagination, too, and I think I’m doing more diverse things now than I’ve ever done.

  1. What has been the most positive aspect of publishing your work?

I get the occasional email from a reader that will tell me how much they enjoyed a particular story, and that’s an unbelievable thrill!  I think the nature of doing erotica is that most readers tend to feel secretive about their reading experiences;  When someone reaches out, it’s very flattering, because it implies that that person is coming out of the shadows a bit to say that a particular story pleased them.  It’s very satisfying.

I’ve also had authors tell me that they were inspired to do their own stories after reading mine.  I try to be as much of a force of positivity as I can be, and I encourage every reader to write their own fantasies at one time or another, even if they never publish it.  The TG community has been too long dismissed, and knowing that there is this community of readers who find TG fantasy fiction enjoyable makes all of us less alone.

  1. What’s coming up next?  Let’s hear about your next projects!

I try to do about a story a week.  Left to my own devices, I can be terribly lazy so I try to keep a consistent schedule to stay productive, otherwise I’d only do a story every couple of months.

The next four or five will be a continuation of the Corporate Takeover series, the conclusion to the Stable Games pony-girl stories, a new Pink Institute story and a sequel to Muffy the Demon Slayer, in no particular order.  Plus, I do a free short-short every month on the website (LykaBloom.com to be shameless for a moment).  And then, who knows?  But something spicy, I’m sure!