Interview: TG Trinity

It’s been a little while since I published an interview, so I am extra excited to being you this interview with TGTrinity, a writer and comic creator who has recently begun publishing work on TG Comics and Stories.  Check it out for thoughts and experiences in the world of TG art:

 

1. Talk about your interest in creating TG fiction and comics.

I’ve been fascinated with gender transformations for as long as I can remember, and that coupled with my overactive imagination led me to where I am now.

I wrote my first TG Comic while I was in High School, and it was about a group of men who volunteered to undergo a procedure to become more powerful. Of course something went wrong with the operation, and all five came out as powerful women. Even at that age I wanted to explore how men would react in such a way, but my teenage sex-addled mind would often lead them into the bed of a man. While anyone who has read my stories or my newer comics can attest to the fact that sex is a big part of my stories, it’s still the change that fascinates me.

The reason why I began publishing my own stories is because I saw a niche that wasn’t being filled. It seemed that every story was about a crazy wizard, and only a few stories actually tried to deliver an interesting take on gender change. I wanted a good mystery, with characters who faced conflict and situations that were less black and white. This led to “Timber Grove”, and the rest is history.

The interesting thing about my work in the TG genre is the fact that my older brother recently told my family that she is taking hormone therapy to live out the rest of her life as a woman. She has absolutely no idea that I write about transgendered transformations, as we’ve grown apart long before she announced her intentions. I don’t know if I’ll ever be able to talk to her about what it is I do, but the situation has greatly changed how I look at what I do.

2. You have a series, TimberGrove, and also do stand alone stories. How does the experience of writing a series versus a stand alone differ for you?

Well, the simple answer is that writing for a series takes a lot of work, while stand alone stories are really nice palate cleanser. With a series there are a lot of moving pieces and plots going on, and I’ve had readers point out loopholes big enough to drive a truck through. In fact, writing Timber Grove stories once felt more like work than a hobby, but I think that I’ve matured as a writer and plan my stories more to avoid the pitfall of getting lost in my own words. Stand alone stories on the other hand are a joy to write. It’s refreshing to sit down in front of my monitor and write without worrying about something I wrote 20,000 words ago.

3. What are some of your favorite TG works in terms of movies. books…etc… and why do they stand out to you?

Obvious answer, but I simply adore Transparent right now. My love of Jeffrey Tambor dates back to Arrested Development, but his portrayal of Maura is simply mind blowing. Also, the fact that they show that transgendered people are just as human as everyone else (and can be just as petty and dumb) is refreshing.

My favorite work among our little community online would definitely be Cblack’s “A Tangled Web”. This comic handles love, loss and lust in a masterful way, and the design of the characters is simply perfect.

4. What was it like the first time you put your work out into the world? I was very nervous myself.

I’m not going to lie, it was a harrowing experience. I didn’t have the nerve to ask someone to proofread what I had (and I used to drive my editors crazy with my lose grasp of proper sentence structure) so I uploaded my work to Fictionmania and sat by computer waiting for it to post. I then did the incredibly cliched thing were I spent the next day hitting refresh on my browser to see if someone would leave a review, because I had never received any feedback about my stories before.

Not my proudest moment, but it got easier with each new story.

5. Tell us about your upcoming projects.

Since I’ve made the jump to comics, I’m taking my time to gather up the right digital content before I work on longer entires. It’s a very costly endeavor, but I’m happy with the early support I’ve received on Patreon and the chance to work on some smaller comics. My hope in the future is to bring Timber Grove to life, but I’m going to need a lot more content to make that dream a reality.

That being said, I’m working on a longer comic called “Popular” that deals with a college student becoming a woman and her slow transformation from perky to ruthless. It’s an interesting endeavor, because my limited access to rendered environments and figures is forcing me to really rethink how I present a story. What was once a sprawling epic is now a story told entirely in one bedroom, and directly to the audience through a “webcam”. It’s a change, but I’m having a lot of fun with it.

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Check out TGTrinity’s website for more great artwork!

http://www.tgtrinity.com/

LULU!!!!

Hey, people!  Just some publication news– I am making my books available on Lulu for the first time!  You can find them on my author page, and I will add more over the next few weeks.  I decided that I wanted to offer more options for readers since not everyone prefers the Kindle.

Some thoughts on my first three Lulu publications:

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Cursed by a witch, King Holland Jordain begins turning into a girl.  One of the first stories I ever wrote, I originally published the first half of this story on Fictionmania under the title Witch War, and it marked the first time I explored in writing an idea I had thought over for many years: what if a man were trapped in the world of a fairy tale princess?  In this case, I added extra dynamics to the mix because as Jordain becomes more feminine in mind and body, his wife takes over rule of the kingdom and his own daughter takes a role in his feminization.  I had a lot of fun in this as the king suddenly finds himself being subjected to all sorts of restrictions and expectations, including a debutante ball and his wife’s desire to see him married off for political advantage.

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I had one idea when I started Voices:  What if all the men on Earth suddenly had high-pitched voices like little girls?  I didn’t have any idea where the story would go or what would happen, but just started with that notion.  As I wrote, I decided to gradually add more changes, so that as the boys got used to their new voices, they had another change and another.  I enjoyed writing the first story so much, I wrote two more.  One took place at the same high-school but featured the outsider kids more than the cool kids, so it mostly focused on a speed metal kid and his girlfriend, and the third featured a group of male and female soldiers.  I really enjoyed this work as it explored how the changes might impact the psychology of a jock, or a punk, or a soldier.  What would happen if a male commanding officer suddenly had the voice of Mini Mouse?  Would people still listen?

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And Krystal Kinsey.   One of my personal favorites to write and a disappointment in that not too many people actually ended up reading it.  For Krystal Kinsey I wanted to explore a story where a straight white man allows himself to be gradually transformed into a woman of color.  The main character, Arthur, considered himself a failure, suffered a lot of self-hatred and has become consumed with the belief that the cure for everything wrong with him is FAME, so when a famous and powerful agent comes along and promises to make all his dreams come true, he is eager to leap into her trap and gradually allows her completely change his identity and turn him into a prancing pop princess whose fame is built as much on his willingness to be used as a sex object as it is his singing.  I loved the character and writing the story, and I had really thought it might be one of my most successful publications, but alas it was not to be!  Now,  maybe a few more people will take a chance and read it!

Check Me Out On Lulu!

The Hero’s Journey: TG Style

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When I began writing the first in my Hero series, I started off with a desire to marry Joseph Cambell’s theories as outlined in Hero with a Thousand Faces to genderfluid fiction.  I thought it would be interesting and fun to use the theory– which has served as the basis for an array of very successful movies from Star Wars to The Matrix to Knocked Up– and apply it to the case of a man who finds himself trapped in the body of a woman.

For those who aren’t familiar, Joseph Campbell was a scholar who decided to study all the world’s myths.  He was intrigued to discover that certain stories were told in every culture throughout history.  The names changed, the settings, but the essence of the stories was the same.

One of the most persistent was that of The Hero’s Journey.  You can find all kinds of sources out there on the particulars– here’s one—  but the core of the idea is that the hero’s journey is universal because it is all about growing up.  When the story starts, the hero is self-centered, selfish, dependent– like a child.  But, through the course of trials and revelations that occur on their adventure, they are transformed into someone who is other centered, independent– like a parent should be.  This story has universal appeal because everyone is either growing up or has grown up.

And so, I started my own story with a character, Pete O’Malley, who had been a tough guy cop, and now finds himself trapped in the body of a beautiful stripper.  Not only is he a woman– and this is a problem for a lot of reasons including the fact that he was an unconscious chauvinist– but he has also lost his status as an NYPD officer.   So, when the story starts, he is mired in a case of the poor mes, focused entirely on himself and his own struggles, and not worried in the least about how his actions and attitudes or even his sex-change– may be impacting other people.

I won’t say anymore about his journey here, but you can read it for yourself if you haven’t.  The story was meant as a stand alone story, but I found myself interested in the character of Pete as well as the others we meet along the way, and so I eventually wrote a sequel and a kind of flash sideways that explored how Pete’s partner dealt with his own sex-change and why his response was so much different than Pete’s.

In all the books, I wanted to have my characters discover their best, heroic selves as a result of their being turned into women, and in each case I felt the character’s personality would have an impact on how they adjusted and accepted or struggled against their new lives as well as their obligations.

I feel the Hero saga is among my best work, and as I finish the third book, I am excited myself to see how all of these characters continue their heroes journeys, and how those journeys transform and remake them into different and, in most cases, better people.

 

He, She and TG

 

 

       Nubia lifted the bottle higher, and some of the dark red wine spilled from the corners of Ambrose mouth and dripped onto his breasts. He swallowed and burst into giggles, falling onto his back again, staring up at the spinning ceiling.  Nubia licked the wine off his soft breasts, then wiped them with the corner of the sheets they lay upon, then looking down at Ambrose’ pretty face, his cloudy, drunken eyes, she said, “Opium!”

            “No,”  Ambrose said.  “I can’t even sit up right now…”

            But then Nubia was sitting him up, and she took a toke of opium and then covered his lips with her own, blowing the smoke into his mouth.  Ambrose inhaled, the world had gone bleary, and he slurred, “I love you so much. By the gods just take me.  Take me now.”

            “Let’s play a game,”  Nubia said, stroking his soft cheek.  “Something different.”  She draped her silken top over his breasts, the top she wore as his slave girl.

            “No,”  Ambrose said, his voice rising into a girlish whine.  “Let’s just make looooove!”

            “For me.  Wear this.  Come on now.”

            “Oh, fine then.  Just hurry.”  Nubia fitted the little silk top over her master’s breasts, tying to strings behind his slender neck, then the panties, the pantaloons, and finally the glittering golden torque, which she locked into place with a clinking of metal. 

            She put her finger under Ambrose’ chin and tilted his head back.  “You are my slave girl now.”

            “Is that what turns you on?”  Ambrose said, barely aware of himself, of what he was doing or saying.  “Do you want me to be your slave girl?”

            “Yes.”

            Ambrose giggled.  Knelt back on his heels, his legs together, shoulders back, breasts out, and then in a tiny little voice he said, “How can I please you master?”

            “Good,” Nubia said.  “Yes.  Very good.  Show me that pretty smile.”

            Ambrose smiled. 

            “Get on your hands and knees.”

From my book, Metanoia

I have generally chosen to keep using my character’s original gender pronouns when writing, even after the character has become fully gender changed in body and even sometimes in mind.  I will often alternate them in a passage to represent the character’s shifting sense of self, in a scene like this:

Paul smiled as he slipped out of his bra, letting his breasts sway free.  His wife, Jane, looked at him, letting her eyes drop from his face to his breasts, and Paul felt his cheeks flush as he glanced down bashfully.  “You’re such a beautiful girl,”  Jane said in her deep, husky voice.   Paul giggled.  He felt so sexy.  Jane lifted his chin and kissed him, then pushed him onto his back and slid her hand down his belly, to the slit between his legs.

Paul gasped as she felt her wife’s fingers slip into her vagina; she arched her back and ran his fingers through his thick, curly hair while Jane put his mouth on one of her nipples and began to suck, and Paul knew he was his wife’s woman now, and he always would be.

One reason I started to keep the pronouns is because I often felt when I read longer works of TG fiction– or saw some movies– that it would often become irrelevant that the characters was gender swapped.  I would essentially forget I was reading or watching a story about a man trapped in a woman’s body.  Especially in cases where the character adjusts, it would usually seem more and more that I was not watching a movie about a man who was turned into a woman at all, but just a movie where an actress started off doing a poor impression of a man and then started to just be herself.

In books, scenes that often seemed very charged for me as a fan of TG fiction when written with male pronouns would become boring with body consistent pronouns, and more so still if the name was also changed.

Paul grabbed his purse and slipped it over his shoulder, pausing to check his make-up

versus

Paulina grabbed her purse and slipped it over her shoulder, pausing to check her make-up

For me, the first sentence is fun as I feel the conflict is embedded in the writing via the use of the male pronouns, whereas the second I will read as just a sentence, or more so a sentence, especially if the pronouns and names switched 100 pages ago.

The essence of drama is conflict, and I want to keep my characters in conflict right up until the very end, where I often will completely switch the pronouns if I want my character to happily accept his new gender.

One of the first scenes I remember reading where this was done to incredible effect was in the first book in the Hot Bloods anthology series.  I can’t seem to find my copy, but the story was by Graham Masterson, and in it the main character wakes up in the body of a super hot woman he has been having an affair with, and when he explores his new body we get a line like, “He reached down and put his hands on his vulva, and then gingerly slipped a finger into his vagina.”

I remember finding that line incredibly impactful in the mixing of male gender words with female anatomy, and I have been drawn to those kinds of sex-scenes ever since.

Of course, we can all do what we want, and I am not trying to tell anyone else how to write. I just personally chose to keep using male or female pronouns even after characters switch for the reasons listed above.  I also tend to write stories about people who are not TG who get switched, so it makes sense in my stories that there is a conflict, whereas many people write stories of discovery where the character is female to begin with but just has the wrong body.

My Amazon Page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rey is Darth Vader (Spoilers)

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Until the next movie comes out and clears up Rey’s origins, I am going to believe that Rey is Darth Vader reborn as a woman.

For those who haven’t seen the movie, stop reading now and go see it.  You really need to.

For those who have, here is my thinking:

Rey has many skills which she could not have learned as an abandoned child living as a scavenger on a wasteland of a planet.  She can pilot a space ship, for example, and when Finn asks her how she did it, she responds, “I don’t know.”

The answer?  Because she learned to pilot in her previous life. As DARTH VADER!

She also knows how to handle a light-saber.  She can fight with one so well, in fact, that she out duels the movie’s baddie, the leader of the Knight of Ren, Kylo Ren.  How could she be so good with a lightsaber without having ever held one before?

Because she learned to use one in her previous life as Darth Freaking Vader!

In addition to her Annakin Skywalker skillset, there are other scenes offering mysterious hints as to her origins.  Kylo Ren, when he tries to use to force to mind control her, senses a connection between them.  “Don’t be scared,” he says.  “I feel it, too.”  The nature of the connection is left vague, but my belief is that what he senses, and doesn’t yet realize, is that the young woman before him is none other than his grandfather, the man he idolizes and seeks to emulate.

Her fear of the light saber she once owned, her eventual claiming of same, the look of tragic sorrow in Luke’s eyes when they meet, a tragic sorrow informed by the fact that Luke knows she is his father– all of these things point Rey, whose name means “king” as Darth Vader.

How, then, could it have happened?  Rumors have been circulating for some time that Darth Plagueis, who had the power to create life, would appear in the next film.  There, it will be revealed that he brought Vader back to life in the shape of a female and hid him on Jakku to await the time when she could be called forth to embrace her heritage.

So, there you have it.  Rey is Darth Vader.   I’m not the only one who thinks so, by the way.   Check out this link: Vader is Chick Now

Okay.  Now, the truth is, I am sure this is all wishful thinking on my part.  I look for TG stuff everywhere!   In fact, my first thought was that she was Obi Wan Kenobi, given her accent.   I only switched it up because we hear Obi Wan speak to her during her vision and say, “Rey, you have taken your first step.”

In fact, I doubt the creators would want to muddle the story by introducing gender fluid elements into the film, or risk backlash from all the people rightfully praising Rey for being such a great character who happens to be female.   Were it suddenly revealed that she was once a man, that might be perceived as undermining her value as a role model.

However, I can assure you that when I went to watch the movie a second time, I pretended it was Darth Vader saying, “Why are you holding my hand?” as Finn tried to make him into a damsel in distress, and it was a lot of fun!

So, even if she doesn’t turn out to be he, go watch it again and pretend.  Everything is more interesting if you give it a gender fluid subtext!

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Kitty Pride and Professor (really) X (Spoilers!)

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So, do you remember the time Professor X tried to do it with the teen-age Kitty Pride, but it wasn’t Kitty Pride but actually Baron Karza, the supreme enemy of the Micronauts?

The subplot, featured in the 4 issue x-Men and the Micronauts mini-series, flirted with Sub/Dom TG.    Baron Karza, trapped in the body of a female and dressed like a slave girl, on his back in such a vulnerable position, his arch-enemy, dominant, ready to make his move.  In the book, realizing his enemy intends to have sex with him, Karza tries desperately to distract his enemy, to keep him busy, because Karza feels physically helpess and unable to defend himself.

To understand the dynamic Chris Claremont was playing with, understand that Baron Karza was the Darth Vader of the micro-verse, the ultimate bad guy.  Like Vader, he always wore armor and a helemt, a cold, distant figure, inscrutable.  He ruled over others, had an near-omnipotence in his realm, and could even take on the form of a centaur, cementing his status as an emblem of masculinity and virility..

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So, for him to find himself trapped in the body of a girl, helpless and in the clutches of a predatory male was as close to a total reversal as could be imagined.

The added level of kind of strange pervyness was that the villain is actually Professor Xavier, and, of course, Kitty Pride was one of his students.  The story line didn’t really delve too much into this, and there were never any ramifications beyond the mini-series, but it was a very interesting, human and flawed Xavier that emerged.

A third little bonus for me was the fact that I had owned many micronauts as a kid and loved them, so now one of my favorite toys had merged with TG fiction, and I was in heaven.

In any case, these kinds of role-changes are very interesting to me.  Karza very quickly chose to play the helpless maiden, seeking to flatter and cajole and manipulate the man who wanted to have sex with him, all his usual shouting and bravado gone.  Yet, he was still Karza, and he was just waiting for the chance to try and kill his enemy.

How much of femininity is simply practicality?  Would any intelligent man, placed in Karza’s situation, resort to passive, feminine strategies?  Would many women, if they were bigger and stronger than the men in their lives, take on the dominant role because they could?

These are the questions I feel we can explore in genderfluid fiction, readily and overtly.  Of course, Chris Clarement, author of the series, didn’t have the freedom to pursue the story line very far or very deep.  The most he could do was play at the surfaces.   But that doesn’t mean, and I am sure others, haven’t written fan fiction in which Baron Karza remains a teen-age girl, and where he comes to find the pleasure in surrender.

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The Hit Girl (Spoilers)

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Status.  Much of life, and much of TG fiction, revolves around the issue of status.  Who gets to be on top and why?  How much of that is related to gender identity, and what would happen to an alpha male type if he were to find himself in a beta-girl body?

The Hit Girl playfully explores all these ideas.  The main character starts the film as a hit man, a big, burly dude who kills people without remorse, but only people who have it coming. Nevertheless, he lives in a world where he does what he wants, solves problems with violence and never feels threatened.   Then, one day while visiting his niece, who he constantly refers to as ‘shorty’ despite the fact she hates it he dismisses her complaints about life in high-school by saying, “I would love to have a teen-age girl’s problems.”

He wakes up in the morning to find himself transformed into a petite teen-age girl, and one with a body more like a middle-school girl at that.  His niece finds great pleasure in seeing him now reduced in stature, both physically and socially, as she is now both taller and stronger than him. In addition, he finds himself facing the value system that society preaches in terms of male and female value.

Early on, he challenges his niece to tell him one good thing about the fact that he is now a teen-age girl.  She shrugs and says, “You’re really pretty?”

The plot of the film then moves along Freaky Friday, Turnabout tracks.  The former man  learns all about what it means to be a girl as he gets used to wearing a bra, deals with mean girl bullies  and has to even turn himself into a sex-object, dressing up as a slutty Catholic school girl and doing some awkward pole dancing as he tries to complete his mission and rescue a kidnapped friend.

A great deal of the humor of the movie involves seeing the character forced to experience life as a female, including being pressed into wearing girl’s clothes and carry around an extremely feminine backpack.  Yet, at the same time, it seeks to ultimate invert or at least challenge the male is better biases of society as the main character increasingly finds himself getting comfortable with and even enjoying aspects of being a girl.  Of course, most pointedly, he learns to reject the idea that he is now helpless and despite his small size and lack of physical strength, he takes on the challenge of taking out the scumbag kidnapper who is planning on trafficking in young women to pay off his debts.

The character, at the end of the film at least, remains female and seems to have accepted his new life.  He gets involved in drama, living his life as Jessica, with talk of his sister adopting him and raising him as her own daughter.    Maybe someday that movie will get made.

This film hits a lot of buttons found in classic TG literature, and I feel does an interesting job exploring the challenges to identity and also the notions of status inherently tied up in gender, age and sex.  It seems to me that the story ultimately suggests that a lot of it has more to do with people’s own attitudes than with anything else.  It’s only embarrassing to be a girl because he feels that being a girl is inferior, but once he lets go of that assumption its just a life, and perhaps a better life than the one he had.  It turns out, having the problems of a teen-age girl really was just what he needed to become a better person.

His status in the eyes of the world may have diminished with his loss in stature, but his happiness is positively bullish.

Available on Amazon