Rom Com: Something New!

Trying something different with my latest ebook, Rom Com. Written along the lines of a 1990s romantic comedy, Rom Com follows the meeting and then evolving relationship between two bros, Kelly and Blake. Kelly initially finds Blake arrogant and pushy, but the two end up hanging out anyway, with Kelly more and more assuming the feminine role in their relationship, both in mind and body.

Can Kelly stop himself from becoming Blake’s perfect girl? Does he even want to?

Find out!

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My Wife and I: Body Swap with Heart!

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Now FREE on Amazon Prime, a new body swap comedy with well-developed characters who delve deep into their relationship issues via a magical body swap. Now, to get right into the TG elements we all love so much– yes, the man in his wife’s body has to experience the things that women go through– make-up, heels, hosting a bachelorette party– and much of this is played as broad comedy. It is fun, and the actors do a great job embodying their roles!

Where the film goes deeper than most broad comedy body swap comedies is in the exploring of the relationships not only between the husband and wife, but their two teen-age children as well. The relationship between the married couple is terrible as the film starts and heading toward divorce, but it isn’t the same old same old. The wife, a successful executive, resents her husband for embracing what she sees as a career of mediocrity while also being the “fun” parent the kids like. She meanwhile is stuck being the major bread winner and the tough Mom. The father, meanwhile, questions whether his wife even loves him and, true to male type, is not a good listener. When they argue, which they do a LOT and LOUD, we see how it impacts their kids. and it is not good.

As they experience life in each other’s bodies, they start to learn about each other, coming to understand not just their partner, but they also learn things about themselves. All of this unfolds gradually and artfully throughout the movie. Again, super well-acted and very moving in certain scenes.

Oh, and back to the TG elements, we do get to see the guy gradually accepting a female role learning to do make-up, helping his daughter deal with feminine issues, and even, spoiler alert– deciding to see what it’s like in the sack! I won’t tell you how that turns out, but this is a good movie worth watching! Oh, and just a as bonus, once he starts getting used to dresses, heels and make-up, the guy is super hot!

Check it out!

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Weird Scenes in NY Basements

hedwig
Hedwig.  This pictures is not from a stand-up show.  I just like it!

I’ve been hitting up the open mic comedy scene in NYC the last couple of weeks.   In New York, there are dozens of places all over the city where people can come and in exchange for 5 dollars they get a 5 minutes of time at the microphone. These typically take place in bar basements, comedy clubs before the pro shows, occasionally coffee shops or restaurants.

What does this have to do with genderfluidity?

A lot.  The thing is, a lot of people show up at these mics because they want a chance to express their rage.  They may think they are comedians, but they are really just angry people, usually white males, who feel entitled to vomit their hate and anger into a room full of strangers under the guise that, hey, it’s a comedy show, so I can say anything I want.

What they want to say a lot of the times is that they hate gay people, and anyone who isn’t hetero-normative.  Recently I was at a mic where a comedian identified herself a bi-sexual and did her set about the trials and tribulations of being bi in a mono world.  Some of the material was funny, but I was the only one that laughed.  The room was cold, unwelcoming. She and her friends left after her performance, and I felt bad for her, but also proud that she had the courage to get up on stage and do her material knowing full well how the room might react.

Shortly after she left, another “comedian” came on stag, grabbed the mic and began screaming, “I am sick of people who feel they have to get here and tell me their sexuality.  Choose a side, bitch!  That’s what I’m saying and choose a side or just start eating ass!”

The crowd cheered, laughed and applauded.

Earlier in the show, a gay comedian had gotten up and talked about how frustrating it was for him that white males would get up at these mics and gay bash, and people would laugh. He was still there, and was among those who wasn’t clapping for the blatant gay bashing.

Not surprisingly, the list of people subjected to open hate speech included African Americans, Jews, gays, bi-racial people and, of course, liberals–  ie, whites who are not hate mongers.  “I’m sick of these liberal pussies and their political correctness!”  Cheers and applause.

The book on millennials is that they are supposedly more open to genderfluidity and racial tolerance than previous generations.  Folks, I was sitting in a room full of millennials, and I can tell you the notion this generation is tolerant is bullshit.  They just know what to say when they take a survey, but give them a stage and a spotlight, and the hate just pours out of them. Not all of them, but just as many as in my generation.

How to respond?  I don’t believe in answering hate with hate.

I am tempted to answer hate with hate, but I don’t.  I think that just fuels the cycle.

Instead, I do bits about male insecurity, and how much of the behavior that guys do to seem “macho” comes from fear.  I talk about how in a group of most men, I can’t praise woman for anything other than her sexual desirability without being mocked and ridiculed, and I suggest that any man who reacts with fear and annoyance to hearing a phrase like, “I am in awe of Tina Fey’s intelligence” should accept and embrace the fact that he is still afraid of girls.  “Accept it.  Embrace it.  And then work on it.”

I get mixed reactions.  Some rooms freeze me out.  Sometimes people thank me.   All reactions are fine.  I do not own other people’s reactions.  I can only do what I do, and let them feel the way they feel about it.

I do feel like I need to keep going to these mics, and hopefully eventually clubs, and I need to bring my message to people because it is important to me that we keep moving forward, keep connecting.  There has been progress, but the forces of intolerance and hate are still out there, and they are always looking for targets, and from what I have seen, there are a whole lot of young people out there just dying for a chance to cheer and laugh at some plain old fashioned gay bashing.