Meowwithme! 5 Questions!

Husband to Bride Cover by meowwithme

You know how sometimes you stumble upon an amazing artist, and you can’t believe you didn’t know about them the whole time they were working!  It blew my mind when I saw the first panel of Meowwithme’s Husband To Bride, and I am so thrilled to bring you five questions with this amazing artist.  Please consider supporting Meowwith me on Patreon, and be sure to check out their Gallery on DeviantArt.  It’s all sooooooo good!

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1.What are your top five favorite pieces of TG media? (Comcis, books, movies… any form!)

If I have to pick top five then it’s animation, manga/comic, movies, gif, and then writing.

2. Which artists do you admire the most, TG or otherwise?

I admire a lot of tg artists such as milda7, kannelart, Heavysnow [artist for Mashiro castle], but the number one person that I admire is this Japanese tg artist call Aji Pontarou. His tg art is very intense and detail, to the point where sometime you can feel what the character is feeling through the changes. My favorite piece from Pontarou is His Class Change to Girlfriend [direct Japanese translated], and I hope to produce a fantasy tg comic just like it one day.

3. Talk about your current works, Husband to Bride and All Princes Shall Be Mine. What excited you about these stories?

I have three current works going on, Husband to Bride, All Princes Shall be Mine, and My Little Sister Amy Part 6. Husband to Bride was actually very stressful. At first, I wasn’t going to color it at all. Imitating someone else’s style was challenging, to the point where I was going to call off the series. But because of the respond from fans on deviantart, patreon, and milda7 herself was so encouraging, I thought I should just draw like my own comic and run with it. All Princes Shall be Mine 2 is a story about the 9 gods that punished a vampire race because they find vampires dangerous. One lone survivor happens to be this talented Lord Nux, this powerful vampire that can genderswap people but he bites them on the neck. Along with his sidekick, Macaron the Succubus, they seek to basically genderswap all the gods and make them yield to Nux haha [it’s a silly story]

I’m usually very happy to draw this story because it has comedy mixes in with a little bit of NSFW element to it. Finally, My Little Sister Amy part 6, is the one I have the hardest time to draw. The only reason it’s coming out so slow is because I try to raise the bar for every new chapter I draw. I tell myself ‘it has to look more beautiful than the last chapter’ so I sometime redraw the page a couple of times before I am satisfied. What excites me about this story is that there’s a new character coming and I hope everyone will like her!
*I also would like to add that I’m not working alone anymore. I have this amazing editor name Charoset by my side, who has been an AMAZING aid in my comic. He oversees all the writings and suggest ideas. Although he is very mean sometimes Lol theres a discord channel dedicated to him call ‘Charoset is mean to me.’

4. Talk about your experience putting your work out there for the world to see. What was it like when you posted your first work? How has the journey been for you?

My experience putting the work for the world to see, oh god haha lol okay ah…it was around before I had to leave the US for good. I just finished my college and it was basically free time for months. I follow TG works regularly and there’s this website that never get updated call Mashiro’s Castle. The website’s main series is called Okashina Futari and it’s about this siblings that can transform each other’s gender at will. It went on a hiatus for a longggg time and I was still dying to read more. One day, I was so bored with my free time I decided to draw a story call my little sister Amy. As I finish one panel, another would follow and before I know it, I drew 23 panels in one sitting. I didn’t know where to post then, so I started on this website call G E hentai. It was this site where I can read a lot of gender bender doujin for free. The respond I got there was…very surprisingly. All responds were positive, and despite how bad the drawing was, people were so excited to read more. And for the first time in my life, I feel like someone out there is waiting to read another work. I got so excited that the next day, I finished My Little sister Amy Part 2 in one sitting as well. The respond was insane, people were hungry for more and in the mail box, there was a message that says ‘where can I find more of your work? On deviantart?’ since then, I made a deviantart account and a lot of people started following. It’s been one year since then, but I think I’ve improved abit and I would love to improve even further. It has been very fun, there were a lot of ups and downs. My end goal is making an animated TG or a TG game in metal slug style.

5. You talk about how you feel your work should be free to everyone to see and enjoy, which is so awesome. Talk a little bit about that for our readers.

Yes, even till today I still firmly believe that my work should be free for everyone to see and enjoy. The reason is because stories are meant to be shared. Stories are what make people come together. They would sit, listen and enjoy. There’s no cost for it. That is why even though I have Patreon, I make it like a donation system. People on Deviantart and other site will still get to read it, but just a bit later, although there’s one thing I get very upset about is people taking my work and posting it as their own. I hiss about that haha.

I hiss about that, too!  Thanks again, and please consider supporting this awesome and talented artist!!!!!

Meowwithme

Interview with me!

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Click Here to Find Out All About Me

This may be an act of extreme narcissism, but just wanted to make you all aware of an amazing interview that is all about me!  Yes.  My favorite topic!  I am, truly, very excited as this is my first ever interview!   So, if you are or have ever been curious about my influences, writing process or thoughts on Agent 38, mosey on over to the link and read all about me!

Click Here to Read About Me!

 

Five Questions with Selkie

The End of the Game (Arabian Nights Book 1)

Check out Selkie’s Book!

Hey, folks.   As previously reported, long-time TG fiction fan and copy editor extraordinaire who has helped me clean up many of my own books, recently published a fantastic TG novel with a lot of fun, forced-femme action.   My relationship with selkie goes back some time, back to when I he/she contacted me to let me know that he/she loved my work, but was being driven insane by all my typos and errors!   The email came with an offer to copy-edit my work, which I politely declined in part because I fancied myself a Jackson Pollock of words, gleefully splashing and dripping my stories onto the page, heedless of a few random marks.

Secondly, because I never worked with anyone, and I was concerned by the logistics of the process as well as the idea that someone might “tamper” with my work.  Well, finally selkie prevailed, and I and a whole bunch of readers are thankful for it!   Well, now, let’s get to the interview!

1.  When did you first become interested in TG fiction?

Dear Lord, that’s testing me.  Let me think… probably when I discovered a paperback called “Miss High Heels” in a second hand book store.  Ah, let’s see… it was the edition with the cover as shown here…  https://openlibrary.org/works/OL7704866W/Miss_High-Heels

I think, though, I’d been working my way towards that for a while, before that .  Through books like The Story of O, The Power of Mesmerism, and others.  But it was only with Miss High Heels I realised I was identifying with the female characters in much or all of the erotica I was reading.  I think the very first erotic book I ever bought was a lesbian love story, come to think of it.  I still have it – I still have all the erotic books I’ve ever bought!  You should see my hard drive.  Uh… that sounded better in my head….

2.  What are your top five favorite pieces of TG media (books, movies, songs…etc…)

Oh, no! That question is impossible for me, since I have such a long list of stuff I’ve found and, uh, you know, ‘thoroughly enjoyed reading’, or watching?  Literally thousands.  I actually plan to write a blog post of my top 100, since I think I could bear to cut the list down to merely one hundred.  But just the top five?

Hmm, I think I have (counts) 57 of your books, and I like a lot of them a lot.  Just picking my favourite of yours is difficult!  Maybe… “Voices“?  But La Vendetta and Jack Danger were very hot, too!
Um, I love Tom Tame’s Pinsedo…  Julia Manchester’s Roleover… Oh!  Ruuen Roga’s Tamashii no Kusari (Soul Chain), thanks to the English translation…  I really liked Jennifer Jane Pope’s ‘slave’ series of full length erotic novels (starting with Slave Genesis).  Um, “The Guinea Pig” by Ruth White, would be one of my top five, I think.  But then so would be “Hush, Hush Woman” from Reluctant Press.  And Liz Jamesguard’s “The Men in the Pink Flannel Suits“.  Oh, and of course the heavily illustrated computer text adventure game Trap Quest, which I found worryingly addictive for the first six months after I found it.  And which I now contribute to.  (Hi, Aika!)

Uh… is that five?  It seems like approximately five, right?

3.  Tell us about Arabian Nights.  What inspired the story?  Why did you choose the rare, but enjoyable, 2nd person POV?

I’ve always particularly liked Virtual Reality situations.  (I have high hopes for the next ten years!)  And I stumbled onto Milida’s “Arabian Nights Gender Changing World” at writing.com, which is what they call an interactive story.  Milida wrote the starting chapter and world background, and then she and others contributed pieces in a branching story structure.  And one day, on one branch, an idea by one contributor – Mr George – really struck a chord with me.  The idea that the women who’d been made, ah, extra busty, weren’t aware of the change.  That seemed hot, so I started contributing.  And because I tend to write too much, my pieces were much longer than the average.

I made a bullet list of about ten points for the plot idea I had, and just started writing, and it grew and grew, and the plot expanded, and the poor hero’s situation kept twisting and changing…  That was basically my first draft of the story.

So I didn’t choose 2nd person POV, that’s the style for the interactive fiction that was the story’s root.  I wrote about 300,000 words of the story before real life stuff intervened.  After about 50,000 words I thought I might publish it one day, just for fun.  And I thought, rather than rewrite it all in 1st person or 3rd person, I’d just let it stand true to its origin.

I hang about on the Trap Quest discord channel a lot, and it was there that I struck up a friendship with my illustrator, Avi.  And since I’d been thinking it’d be nice to have the story sprinkled with some images, we decided to go into it together.  We’ll be splitting the profits, if we make some!  We both hope the series may prove popular.  Though I know he’s keener to illustrate some of my other planned books – he’s more into sci fi.

4.  I believe this is your first time publishing a TG book on Amazon.  Describe that experience for our readers.

Heh.  Because it’s illustrated, and because I use LibreOffice, it was far, far harder than I’d expected.  I’m going to blog about that experience soon, too.  Some of the problems – caused by a couple of bugs in LO – almost sent me mad.  I was chatting to a couple of people while I teetered on the brink of insanity, trying to wrestle the ebook version into submission, and their amused reactions I think pulled me back from the brink.  I have 12 or 20 bug reports waiting for me to file.  I spent a day reproducing the problems and I still need to file separate bug reports related to image handling. That’ll probably take another full day, but I suspect the bugs are still there because no one has yet given them good, reproducible example of the problems.  I have… 59 files created, as I worked through reproducing the problems.

Hmm.  That makes LibreOffice sound awful, where it’s really very good, in general.  Just the image handling stuff has some serious bugs that make you pull your hair out.

The Amazon side of things was very smooth and easy, in comparison.  I used Calibre to generate the .mobi file to upload to Amazon.  Creating an author page and filling out the tax info and all that was straightforward.  I’m also using Ingram Spark for the ebooks as well – since we might produce some collections as print books too – and also on Smashwords.

And then you pointed out those embarrassing typos I’d introduced (by sloppy mousing: “realise” getting turned into “realism” when I thought I’d selected “realize”), so I corrected and uploaded a revised edition and also asked Amazon to push it out to people who’ve already bought the book.  They may or may not do that; they said:

"If we find only minor corrections,  we won't notify customers by e-mail, but we'll activate their ability to update the content through the “Manage Your Content and Devices” page on Amazon.com."

On the ‘plus’ side, I now know how to make illustrated books with the tools at my disposal, reliably and without any hair-pulling.

5.  What comes next for our erstwhile heroine? (If you can talk about it without giving away too many spoilers!)

Ah, well, without spoilers?  Tricky…. We plan to illustrate the whole series.  Um, what else?  John Lemure (the main character), is pretty feisty and determined.  He’s not the type to give up.  On the other hand, the whole blasted VR world seems to have a surprising number of opportunities for gender swaps and transformations, and he has annoyed many of the quite cunning women in his harem.

I also like a fair bit of sex in my stories, as you probably noticed.  Is that fan service?  So each book will have a lot of hot situations.  And I have plotted it out, and there is also a ‘big picture’ that will gradually be revealed.

I like mental changes, too.  But perhaps more along the lines of conditioning rather than mind control per se.  I also enjoy the idea of the body influencing the mind.

6.  Hit us up with anything you want to say that wasn’t covered above!

Probably from these stupidly long-winded replies you can tell I enjoy writing; and even that I prefer longer fiction to short stories.  For my erotica, I also want to give good value for money, so (like you) I will have each book a solid length.   (I just realised that sounds a bit suggestive.  Heh.)

I also feel erotic fiction is kind of the genre everyone looks down on, but I don’t see it needs to be that way.  I mean, the literary fiction crowd tends to look down on all genre fiction writers.  And many genre writers (sci-fi, detective, thriller…) look down on the Romance writers (I think because of the whole Mills & Boon thing).  And the Romance writers look down on the writers of erotica.  Which I think is all a bit mean.  For example, The Story of O is really well-written.

I think it’s sad that Western culture adopts that stance when it comes to human sexuality.  Personally, I see no reason why erotica can’t have real story, plot and characters.  So, after Arabian Nights, I have several more sci-fi/erotica genre blended stories already sketched out and under way.  It’s one of the things I like about your own books, and the other writers I mentioned above: they’re all proper stories, not just porn.  They’re a celebration and exploration of the fun and pleasure we can have with sex.  Even if sometimes we like to explore some darker kinks in our fantasies.

Oh!  Sunstone!  I didn’t list Sunstone because it’s not TG, and it’s not even really erotica in my view – it’s just a delightful love story that happens to have a lesbian couple into BDSM as its two main protagonists.  And like all Stejpan Sejic’s graphic novels and comics, it’s just gorgeously painted.  I love the expressiveness of his characters.  Expressions matter a lot to me (and Avi).  We spent a lot of time getting the expressions right on all the characters in each illustration.

I suppose I’ve probably gone way over the word limit you’d allocated for this interview (and it’s now 6:30am for me, so it’s long past my time to go to bed) but maybe I can just mention my blog, https://selkiesite.wordpress.com/?  I plan to post to it more regularly now the 1st novel is bedded down.

And thank you so much for interviewing me.  I will now shut up.  Bye!

Thank you for taking the time, and I can’t wait for the next book in the series!

Five Questions with Nikki Jenkins

The Curse by [Jenkins, Nikki S.]Nepotism (The Omar Bell Universe Book 3) by [Jenkins, Nikki S.]

 

Hey, folks.  Nikki Jenkins was awesome enough to take the time to answer a few questions about her work as a writer of TG fiction.  I am a big fan of her writing, which you can find on Amazon.com. Also, be sure to check out her website!  ALERT:  The website does include some nudity!

  1. Talk about your interest in creating TG fiction.

 

Going back as long as I can remember, I’ve been interested in TG fiction, but my first real exposure to it was an illustrated site that dealt with the feminization of men by strong women.  I can’t for the life of me remember the name of it (it’s been quite a while), but it sparked an interest in this very specific type of erotica.

 

For the longest time, I was a spectator; I simply consumed whatever media was out there (mostly on Fictionmania or a few caption sites).  The reality of it is that I’m a bit obsessive, and when I’m interested in something, I focus on it pretty intently, and it wasn’t long before I’d exhausted the supply of fiction out there.  So to satisfy that “obsession”, I really didn’t have much of a choice but to start writing my own stories.  That was the genesis of the Omar Bell Universe, which in turn led to my caption site and my subsequent work.

 

I guess the simplest answer to your question is that I started to create TG fiction because I wanted a better (and more plentiful) representation of my own personal kinks.  However, once I started, I can’t deny that the positive reinforcement of the mostly-good responses to my work propelled me to commit more time to this part of my life.

 

  1. In the Omar Bell books, as well as in works like a Warrior Reborn, the characters are radically feminized in mind and body, but kept biologically male.  Can you discuss why this transformation interests you, and how it is different to explore than a full biological change as happens in The Curse?

 

In most of my stories, I think the retention of “male-ness” is important because it provides a tangible representation of the internal duality of the protagonist’s nature.  Sure, once the transformation is complete, each protagonist (like Tristan, in A Warrior Reborn) is quite feminine, body and mind, but he retains certain aspects of masculinity (the penis and a lack of breasts) because it’s important for the reader (and the character) to be reminded that this is NOT a woman.   That feeds into the “humiliation” of it all because they can never forget that they’re different.

 

With The Curse, the humiliation aspect of a forced transformation was covered with Anna, so it was completely unnecessary (and a bit redundant) for Josh’s character to dwell on that.  So I decided to give him a bit of closure and a fresh start.

 

Literary reasons aside, if I had to examine my personal attraction to that sort of transformation, I’d  pinpoint my fascination with anything that’s abnormal.  I like weird kinks; it’s as simple as that.

 

 

  1. What are some of your favorite TG works, and why do they stand out for you?

 

I think my favorite TG work is an interactive story presented by “Sissy Trainer” on a now-defunct blog of the same name.  It was called “Pink Slipped” and focused on a young man who loses his job as a construction worker and is forced to take a job as a secretary at his girlfriend’s office.  He’s subsequently feminized, objectified, and ultimately used by his superiors.  It was a great (but very simple) story with fantastic visual aids.

 

Second would be a series I found on Fictionmania called “College Changes a Boy” by Taylor Jordan which follows a college boy’s first visit home after a year away at school (during which he changed quite a bit).  It’s written pretty well, but its real strength is that it does a great job contrasting the “before” and “after” versions of the character.  It’s unfinished (sadly), but it’s still worth a read.

 

Of course, I love Bob H’s Switch World series because of its description of a global change, and I absolutely adore “Voices” by TG Cooper for the same reason.

 

There are so many more, mostly available on Fictionmania, but I won’t waste anyone’s time by describing them all.  I do go into a little more detail on my blog, though, if anyone’s interested in my opinions.

 

 

  1. What was the experience like for you when you first put your TG work out there for the public?

 

Nerve-wracking!  Seriously – I remember posting the first Omar Bell story on Fictionmania, and then checking every five minutes to see if anyone had left a review.  I needed that validation, you know?  Once they started rolling in, though, I relaxed a bit.  It was fairly well-received, and I think that justified (in my mind at least) the whole project.

 

There were definitely some comments that made me angry, though.  Dealing with such a touchy subject, I suppose it was inevitable, but I’ll admit I got a bit defensive about some of the negative comments.  I even went so far as to write some responses into the next couple of stories, which, in hindsight, was kind of bad form.

 

When I launched my first blog (a caption site based on the Omar Bell series), I opened myself up to a lot more criticism.  By that point, I was fairly confident in my writing ability, but I wasn’t nearly as convinced that my artistic ability was up to par.  It wasn’t, by the way.  I look back at those first attempts at photo modification, and I cringe.  Still – it had to happen.  I had to progress through that before I could get better.

 

By the time I actually published a story on Amazon, I had pretty tough skin.  I knew there would be detractors, but I also knew that the product (An Experiment) was pretty solid.

 

  1. Tell us about your upcoming projects.

Oh – the fun part!  Between my long-form caption stories, my Amazon releases, and my daily captions, I have a LOT on my plate.  So I have a bit of difficulty nailing down release dates.  But here are my next few projects:

 

  1. Untitled Caption Story (request)

This one is a user-commissioned caption story (about 20-30 frames) that focuses on a young man who’s feminized by his Korean girlfriend.  It’s a fairly simple story, but the visual transformation is fantastic.

 

  1. American Tranny

I’m super excited about this one because it’s a bit of a departure for me because it is definitely NOT erotica.  It’s a story about a teenage transgender girl who is forced to hide her transition from her bigoted father.  After a sexual assault, she’s forced out of the closet, and must confront the challenges associated with being a rape survivor, a transgender girl, and the abandonment of her father.

 

I know – heavy stuff for someone who’s focused primarily on erotica, but I felt that it’s a story that needs to be told.  I’m about a third of the way through with the text (it’s been extensively outlined), so it shouldn’t be that long before it’s published.

 

  1. The Witness

This is an adaptation of one of my caption stories that follows a young man who is forced into hiding after seeing his father’s murder.  The text story will differ from the caption story in a few key ways, but will follow the general plot.

 

  1. More Omar Bell!

I’ve still got about five or six Omar Bell stories to publish.

 

  1. Various

I’m working on a few more stories.  One is a story about a professional basketball player who suddenly starts to transform, and ends up as a twelve-year-old white girl (outlined and started).  Another is a story about two men who, after an encounter with a stripper at a bachelor party, begin to transform (outlined and started).  I have one where I deal with human pets that has barely passed the concept stage.  And finally, I have a story outlined where a young man slowly takes the place of his trophy-wife stepmother.

 

Yeah – I’m a bit flighty and have a ton of projects working at any given time.  Focusing on just one is difficult for me.


Thanks, Nikki. Can’t wait to see your stuff!

Interview: TG Trinity

It’s been a little while since I published an interview, so I am extra excited to being you this interview with TGTrinity, a writer and comic creator who has recently begun publishing work on TG Comics and Stories.  Check it out for thoughts and experiences in the world of TG art:

 

1. Talk about your interest in creating TG fiction and comics.

I’ve been fascinated with gender transformations for as long as I can remember, and that coupled with my overactive imagination led me to where I am now.

I wrote my first TG Comic while I was in High School, and it was about a group of men who volunteered to undergo a procedure to become more powerful. Of course something went wrong with the operation, and all five came out as powerful women. Even at that age I wanted to explore how men would react in such a way, but my teenage sex-addled mind would often lead them into the bed of a man. While anyone who has read my stories or my newer comics can attest to the fact that sex is a big part of my stories, it’s still the change that fascinates me.

The reason why I began publishing my own stories is because I saw a niche that wasn’t being filled. It seemed that every story was about a crazy wizard, and only a few stories actually tried to deliver an interesting take on gender change. I wanted a good mystery, with characters who faced conflict and situations that were less black and white. This led to “Timber Grove”, and the rest is history.

The interesting thing about my work in the TG genre is the fact that my older brother recently told my family that she is taking hormone therapy to live out the rest of her life as a woman. She has absolutely no idea that I write about transgendered transformations, as we’ve grown apart long before she announced her intentions. I don’t know if I’ll ever be able to talk to her about what it is I do, but the situation has greatly changed how I look at what I do.

2. You have a series, TimberGrove, and also do stand alone stories. How does the experience of writing a series versus a stand alone differ for you?

Well, the simple answer is that writing for a series takes a lot of work, while stand alone stories are really nice palate cleanser. With a series there are a lot of moving pieces and plots going on, and I’ve had readers point out loopholes big enough to drive a truck through. In fact, writing Timber Grove stories once felt more like work than a hobby, but I think that I’ve matured as a writer and plan my stories more to avoid the pitfall of getting lost in my own words. Stand alone stories on the other hand are a joy to write. It’s refreshing to sit down in front of my monitor and write without worrying about something I wrote 20,000 words ago.

3. What are some of your favorite TG works in terms of movies. books…etc… and why do they stand out to you?

Obvious answer, but I simply adore Transparent right now. My love of Jeffrey Tambor dates back to Arrested Development, but his portrayal of Maura is simply mind blowing. Also, the fact that they show that transgendered people are just as human as everyone else (and can be just as petty and dumb) is refreshing.

My favorite work among our little community online would definitely be Cblack’s “A Tangled Web”. This comic handles love, loss and lust in a masterful way, and the design of the characters is simply perfect.

4. What was it like the first time you put your work out into the world? I was very nervous myself.

I’m not going to lie, it was a harrowing experience. I didn’t have the nerve to ask someone to proofread what I had (and I used to drive my editors crazy with my lose grasp of proper sentence structure) so I uploaded my work to Fictionmania and sat by computer waiting for it to post. I then did the incredibly cliched thing were I spent the next day hitting refresh on my browser to see if someone would leave a review, because I had never received any feedback about my stories before.

Not my proudest moment, but it got easier with each new story.

5. Tell us about your upcoming projects.

Since I’ve made the jump to comics, I’m taking my time to gather up the right digital content before I work on longer entires. It’s a very costly endeavor, but I’m happy with the early support I’ve received on Patreon and the chance to work on some smaller comics. My hope in the future is to bring Timber Grove to life, but I’m going to need a lot more content to make that dream a reality.

That being said, I’m working on a longer comic called “Popular” that deals with a college student becoming a woman and her slow transformation from perky to ruthless. It’s an interesting endeavor, because my limited access to rendered environments and figures is forcing me to really rethink how I present a story. What was once a sprawling epic is now a story told entirely in one bedroom, and directly to the audience through a “webcam”. It’s a change, but I’m having a lot of fun with it.

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Check out TGTrinity’s website for more great artwork!

http://www.tgtrinity.com/

5 Questions with Donald Allen Kirch

dropdead.jpg

Hey, folks!  I am so happy to share with you my interview with Donald Allen Kirch, author of the recently released TG horror novel Drop Dead Gorgeous, as well as the TG classic The Misadventures of Ka-Ron the Knight, one of my all time favorite TG works.

Enjoy!

1. What are your top three TG experiences in terms of books, films, videos, songs?

I kind ‘a fell into “TG” fiction. I loved the movie “Just One of the Guys” and “Switch” when I was younger. I have always found the “possibilities” of this genre fascinating.

2. One of the things I admired about Ka-Ron was that you created a very detailed and fascinating fantasy world of your own in which to place the TG adventures of Ka-Ron. Can you talk about the world building process and why the details of the world were important to Ka-Ron’s story?

First and foremost, if the background of a story is not believable, neither will the front story. I created the “Ka-Ron” universe to be taken seriously. I hoped that it would be seen as a serious fantasy story. The “TG” element was added later on. Most stories which take this route, the main character deserves what happens to him. Ka-Ron, on the other hand, is an innocent. He is an honorable man. The story of the love that grew between Jatel and him/her would never have worked if their world was not believable. My favorite part of the Ka-Ron universe was the creation of “My Dwarfs.” Unlike any other fantasy, Dorian was a class act. The wizards and wicca masters, the steampunk quality of the Argo, and even mixing horror with science fiction – all of it was just plain fun to create. I love these characters. They are like family to me.

In creating this world, I took the best and most tragic memories of my own life and incorporated them into the story. I have a “game” I like to play when writing: I, honestly, place myself into each story I write. In other words: One of the characters in Ka-Ron’s world is “me” – in mind, body, and spirit. In this case: Jatel. If anyone who has ever read this story were to meet me, they would say, “Hey! You remind me of Jatel.” Don’t know what I would do if I woke up as the “female” version of Jatel, but it would be fun trying to find out.

3. In both Ka-Ron and your latest, Drop Dead Gorgeous, the men are turned into women as a punishment. Can you discuss why the themes of forced sex-change and revenge interest you as a writer?

There is nothing more frightening that losing one’s identity. These two characters are normal men doing their parts in the world they are both comfortable with. Then, BAM! They wake to discover they have brand new bodies and that everything they know, have been taught, and understand about the universe…is gone. Scary stuff.

I also am a sucker for the “fish out of water” story. You’ve probably heard this said before, “If I had boobs I’d never leave the house.” Guys say that with a confident chuckle. What would they really do if they woke to a 38-24-36 body? They’d scream themselves into a coma. Their understanding of the world would be gone. It’s within that frightening fear that I like to walk.

4. Can you talk about your journey as a writer? What was the process like for you in terms of reaching the point where you felt ready to put your work out there for the world to see?

Writing is a cruel taskmaster. It’s demanding, lonely, and fantastically fulfilling. It takes great courage to expose your work. I have been writing since I was 13. Each story is a complete journey, and I learn so much about myself upon completion. However, I was quite shy when I first started doing this. It took a great deal of soul searching for publishing my first book. One bit of advice I can give to any writer starting out: Always remember – no matter how good your work is, there will always be that “one” who will gain great pleasure out of trying to bring you down. Whether it be the local “Grammar Nazi” or critic…you cannot please everyone. Learn to ignore what people say, and accept praise with honest humility. Most important: Never take “No” for an answer. Learn to accept rejection as a learning experience, and move onward to the next publisher, agent, or editor.

5. What has been the most positive aspect of publishing your work?

I’ve learned so much about who I am. Before “The Misadventures of Ka-Ron the Knight” I barely understood what “TG” was. As I have moved forward with this adventure, I have come to admire the courage and pioneering spirit of these brave people, and I hope that I have created heroes for them to embrace. Friends have come forward, informing me that I gave them the courage to stand tall and make their personal choice to go forward with their transition. That it was the acceptance of Ka-Ron and Jatel, when each went through their adventures; and that it was love which saved them both – these stories helped them say “Yes.” I am happy with who I am and where I stand in my life. If, however, I awoke within Jatel’s female body…after a few hours of heavy meltdown…well…I could live with it.

6. What’s coming up next? Let’s hear about your next projects!

I am working on a second book in the “DROP DEAD GEOGEOUS” series. An audio book will be coming out for DDG later this year. Keep in mind, “DROP DEAD GORGEOUS” is a horror novel. It is filled with gore and some disturbing scenes. Not at all like “Ka-Ron.” Speaking of Ka-Ron, the rights of the first trilogy revert back to me at the end of 2017. I plan to see if I can republish in the States. I am also finishing up a prequel trilogy in Ka-Ron’s universe which follows the heroic adventures and tragic downfall of Count Voslow. Next to Dorian, the Count is one of my favorite characters. I have at least four novels I am currently researching. I am always looking for a great story to tell.

I hope to meet all of you, one day. Perhaps, we can meet, plan a quest, learn a little about each other, and fulfill a quest on our way to Mull Garden.

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You can find links to all of Donald’s books on his homepage where you can also buy his books from a variety of sources and in a variety of formats.

Thanks, Donald, for a great interview!

5 Questions with Lyka Bloom

lykabloom

Hey, readers!  Today I am extremely happy to share with you my interview with one of my favorite TG writers, Lyka Bloom!

 

  1. What are your top three TG experiences in terms of books, films, videos, songs?

It’s hard to remember now where the interest came from.  I was always fascinated by mental and physical manipulation of one form or another.  There’s a Clive Barker story called The Madonna Pool that was one of the first memories I have of reading gender transformation and really responding to it.  For some reason, Saturday morning cartoons seemed to be littered with gender change storylines, and I always found those viscerally attractive to me.  I know I am being vague, but it’s hard to point to a single thing, or even three things, that were formative.  Lately, I can point to certain books others have done.  I loved Pinsedo by Tom Tame, and I thought Allmyth was really wonderful, too.

  1. Why does the theme of TG interest you as an artist?

I think like science fiction at its best, the TG world allows you to do morality plays and also examine a real issue beneath the obvious real-world TG issues.  You can do crime-and-punishment stories in a way that has a sexy edge, and who doesn’t like a little sexiness in their lives?

Also, the idea of becoming something that you were not before appeals to me.  I think there’s a long-standing taboo regarding men expressing femininity, so I like to play with those ideas.  For some of my characters, the idea is repulsive while others hurtle towards it.  Sometimes it is a punishment, but that leads to the idea of how you can punish someone who is no longer the person they were.  I think my work tends to be a softer branch of the genre, where I introduce some optimism amid the changing bodies and minds.

We live in a time now when gender fluidity is more acceptable, and playing with the variations of the masculine and feminine, whether that’s shemale or futa or what have you, is fun as a writer.  You can explore the notion of attraction – what’s sexy now?  Is it the buxom woman or the slender man, is it the muscular, tall woman or the man with long hair and a hint of makeup?   Honestly, one of the biggest challenges is keeping up with how culture is changing.  As much bigotry and sexism exists, there is a surprising acceptance and tolerance for LGBT issues, and that’s really refreshing to see.  I think more people are open to the kinds of work I do and other authors in the genre do.  It’s come out of the closet, so to speak.

  1. TG fiction is very category driven.  What types of TG fiction are you most drawn to writing?  Why?

I really like the magical and mythological TG fiction.  I’ve always been attracted to the discordance in the male mind in the feminine body and so forth, so much of my fiction has to do with the man being conditioned into womanhood.  There’s an element of reluctance to it, but I don’t generally do humiliation in the stories, which is a theme I see running through a lot of the TG fiction.  I suppose I’m enough of a romantic to want a happy ending for most of my characters.  Even if they are fundamentally changed by the end of the story, the characters tend to be left happy.

I’m intrigued by the humiliation/sissy stories, but I’ve never been able to successfully write one.  Halfway through, I end up finding a way to make the characters find the upside in things. Sometimes I wish I was crueler, because some of that work is fantastic!  Ann Michelle, in particular, I enjoy for her feminization stories, and Kylie Gable does fantastic stuff there, too.

For me, I like to be more Cinemax than XXX, though I do like to get naughtier now and then but I think real affection between the characters finds its way in, whether I want it to or not.

  1. Can you talk about your journey as an artist?  Who were your influences? What was the process like for you in terms of reaching the point where you felt ready to put your work out there for the world to see?

My mainstream influences were Stephen King and Clive Barker, because I loved horror novels for most of my childhood.  I think King, in particular, has an eye for subtle detail that really grounds the stories of the fantastic in reality, and I still love that.  I try to do a hint of that in my work, but only a reader can say if I have any success in that arena.

I’ve written in one form or another for years and years, but I think the moment when I was ready to publish my work came when I was reading some of the stories available in this genre.  Yes, I’m a fan, too.  Without being overly critical, it really was a case of reading something and thinking I could do better, or at least no worse.  And then I read some truly impressive pieces and I realized that, yes, there is an element of the erotic in these stories, but there’s also real work being done to make interesting characters and to explore the nature of gender identity and sexual identity.  I put out a couple of stories to see if anyone was interested and they did quite well.  That really gave me the confidence to start producing more, and to play with expectations a little, too.  While the vast majority of my work is in the TG realm, I step outside of it to do some other things, including some horror erotica that is definitely influenced by my early reading.

What has surprised me most about starting and having been writing in this genre for several years now is the loyalty of the readers and the creativity that they express, too.  I started a Patreon thing so that readers could contribute and, in exchange, I would develop as try based around their ideas.  So, stories like the “Muffy the Demon Slayer” tale and “Casino of Change” are ideas that came from readers (I hesitate to call them fans, it sounds immodest to me) who were kind enough to offer a contribution in exchange for entrusting me with a story they would like to see.  It’s really fired my imagination, too, and I think I’m doing more diverse things now than I’ve ever done.

  1. What has been the most positive aspect of publishing your work?

I get the occasional email from a reader that will tell me how much they enjoyed a particular story, and that’s an unbelievable thrill!  I think the nature of doing erotica is that most readers tend to feel secretive about their reading experiences;  When someone reaches out, it’s very flattering, because it implies that that person is coming out of the shadows a bit to say that a particular story pleased them.  It’s very satisfying.

I’ve also had authors tell me that they were inspired to do their own stories after reading mine.  I try to be as much of a force of positivity as I can be, and I encourage every reader to write their own fantasies at one time or another, even if they never publish it.  The TG community has been too long dismissed, and knowing that there is this community of readers who find TG fantasy fiction enjoyable makes all of us less alone.

  1. What’s coming up next?  Let’s hear about your next projects!

I try to do about a story a week.  Left to my own devices, I can be terribly lazy so I try to keep a consistent schedule to stay productive, otherwise I’d only do a story every couple of months.

The next four or five will be a continuation of the Corporate Takeover series, the conclusion to the Stable Games pony-girl stories, a new Pink Institute story and a sequel to Muffy the Demon Slayer, in no particular order.  Plus, I do a free short-short every month on the website (LykaBloom.com to be shameless for a moment).  And then, who knows?  But something spicy, I’m sure!