Five Questions with Nikki Jenkins

The Curse by [Jenkins, Nikki S.]Nepotism (The Omar Bell Universe Book 3) by [Jenkins, Nikki S.]

 

Hey, folks.  Nikki Jenkins was awesome enough to take the time to answer a few questions about her work as a writer of TG fiction.  I am a big fan of her writing, which you can find on Amazon.com. Also, be sure to check out her website!  ALERT:  The website does include some nudity!

  1. Talk about your interest in creating TG fiction.

 

Going back as long as I can remember, I’ve been interested in TG fiction, but my first real exposure to it was an illustrated site that dealt with the feminization of men by strong women.  I can’t for the life of me remember the name of it (it’s been quite a while), but it sparked an interest in this very specific type of erotica.

 

For the longest time, I was a spectator; I simply consumed whatever media was out there (mostly on Fictionmania or a few caption sites).  The reality of it is that I’m a bit obsessive, and when I’m interested in something, I focus on it pretty intently, and it wasn’t long before I’d exhausted the supply of fiction out there.  So to satisfy that “obsession”, I really didn’t have much of a choice but to start writing my own stories.  That was the genesis of the Omar Bell Universe, which in turn led to my caption site and my subsequent work.

 

I guess the simplest answer to your question is that I started to create TG fiction because I wanted a better (and more plentiful) representation of my own personal kinks.  However, once I started, I can’t deny that the positive reinforcement of the mostly-good responses to my work propelled me to commit more time to this part of my life.

 

  1. In the Omar Bell books, as well as in works like a Warrior Reborn, the characters are radically feminized in mind and body, but kept biologically male.  Can you discuss why this transformation interests you, and how it is different to explore than a full biological change as happens in The Curse?

 

In most of my stories, I think the retention of “male-ness” is important because it provides a tangible representation of the internal duality of the protagonist’s nature.  Sure, once the transformation is complete, each protagonist (like Tristan, in A Warrior Reborn) is quite feminine, body and mind, but he retains certain aspects of masculinity (the penis and a lack of breasts) because it’s important for the reader (and the character) to be reminded that this is NOT a woman.   That feeds into the “humiliation” of it all because they can never forget that they’re different.

 

With The Curse, the humiliation aspect of a forced transformation was covered with Anna, so it was completely unnecessary (and a bit redundant) for Josh’s character to dwell on that.  So I decided to give him a bit of closure and a fresh start.

 

Literary reasons aside, if I had to examine my personal attraction to that sort of transformation, I’d  pinpoint my fascination with anything that’s abnormal.  I like weird kinks; it’s as simple as that.

 

 

  1. What are some of your favorite TG works, and why do they stand out for you?

 

I think my favorite TG work is an interactive story presented by “Sissy Trainer” on a now-defunct blog of the same name.  It was called “Pink Slipped” and focused on a young man who loses his job as a construction worker and is forced to take a job as a secretary at his girlfriend’s office.  He’s subsequently feminized, objectified, and ultimately used by his superiors.  It was a great (but very simple) story with fantastic visual aids.

 

Second would be a series I found on Fictionmania called “College Changes a Boy” by Taylor Jordan which follows a college boy’s first visit home after a year away at school (during which he changed quite a bit).  It’s written pretty well, but its real strength is that it does a great job contrasting the “before” and “after” versions of the character.  It’s unfinished (sadly), but it’s still worth a read.

 

Of course, I love Bob H’s Switch World series because of its description of a global change, and I absolutely adore “Voices” by TG Cooper for the same reason.

 

There are so many more, mostly available on Fictionmania, but I won’t waste anyone’s time by describing them all.  I do go into a little more detail on my blog, though, if anyone’s interested in my opinions.

 

 

  1. What was the experience like for you when you first put your TG work out there for the public?

 

Nerve-wracking!  Seriously – I remember posting the first Omar Bell story on Fictionmania, and then checking every five minutes to see if anyone had left a review.  I needed that validation, you know?  Once they started rolling in, though, I relaxed a bit.  It was fairly well-received, and I think that justified (in my mind at least) the whole project.

 

There were definitely some comments that made me angry, though.  Dealing with such a touchy subject, I suppose it was inevitable, but I’ll admit I got a bit defensive about some of the negative comments.  I even went so far as to write some responses into the next couple of stories, which, in hindsight, was kind of bad form.

 

When I launched my first blog (a caption site based on the Omar Bell series), I opened myself up to a lot more criticism.  By that point, I was fairly confident in my writing ability, but I wasn’t nearly as convinced that my artistic ability was up to par.  It wasn’t, by the way.  I look back at those first attempts at photo modification, and I cringe.  Still – it had to happen.  I had to progress through that before I could get better.

 

By the time I actually published a story on Amazon, I had pretty tough skin.  I knew there would be detractors, but I also knew that the product (An Experiment) was pretty solid.

 

  1. Tell us about your upcoming projects.

Oh – the fun part!  Between my long-form caption stories, my Amazon releases, and my daily captions, I have a LOT on my plate.  So I have a bit of difficulty nailing down release dates.  But here are my next few projects:

 

  1. Untitled Caption Story (request)

This one is a user-commissioned caption story (about 20-30 frames) that focuses on a young man who’s feminized by his Korean girlfriend.  It’s a fairly simple story, but the visual transformation is fantastic.

 

  1. American Tranny

I’m super excited about this one because it’s a bit of a departure for me because it is definitely NOT erotica.  It’s a story about a teenage transgender girl who is forced to hide her transition from her bigoted father.  After a sexual assault, she’s forced out of the closet, and must confront the challenges associated with being a rape survivor, a transgender girl, and the abandonment of her father.

 

I know – heavy stuff for someone who’s focused primarily on erotica, but I felt that it’s a story that needs to be told.  I’m about a third of the way through with the text (it’s been extensively outlined), so it shouldn’t be that long before it’s published.

 

  1. The Witness

This is an adaptation of one of my caption stories that follows a young man who is forced into hiding after seeing his father’s murder.  The text story will differ from the caption story in a few key ways, but will follow the general plot.

 

  1. More Omar Bell!

I’ve still got about five or six Omar Bell stories to publish.

 

  1. Various

I’m working on a few more stories.  One is a story about a professional basketball player who suddenly starts to transform, and ends up as a twelve-year-old white girl (outlined and started).  Another is a story about two men who, after an encounter with a stripper at a bachelor party, begin to transform (outlined and started).  I have one where I deal with human pets that has barely passed the concept stage.  And finally, I have a story outlined where a young man slowly takes the place of his trophy-wife stepmother.

 

Yeah – I’m a bit flighty and have a ton of projects working at any given time.  Focusing on just one is difficult for me.


Thanks, Nikki. Can’t wait to see your stuff!

Five Questions with Nikki Jenkins

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