He, She and TG

 

 

       Nubia lifted the bottle higher, and some of the dark red wine spilled from the corners of Ambrose mouth and dripped onto his breasts. He swallowed and burst into giggles, falling onto his back again, staring up at the spinning ceiling.  Nubia licked the wine off his soft breasts, then wiped them with the corner of the sheets they lay upon, then looking down at Ambrose’ pretty face, his cloudy, drunken eyes, she said, “Opium!”

            “No,”  Ambrose said.  “I can’t even sit up right now…”

            But then Nubia was sitting him up, and she took a toke of opium and then covered his lips with her own, blowing the smoke into his mouth.  Ambrose inhaled, the world had gone bleary, and he slurred, “I love you so much. By the gods just take me.  Take me now.”

            “Let’s play a game,”  Nubia said, stroking his soft cheek.  “Something different.”  She draped her silken top over his breasts, the top she wore as his slave girl.

            “No,”  Ambrose said, his voice rising into a girlish whine.  “Let’s just make looooove!”

            “For me.  Wear this.  Come on now.”

            “Oh, fine then.  Just hurry.”  Nubia fitted the little silk top over her master’s breasts, tying to strings behind his slender neck, then the panties, the pantaloons, and finally the glittering golden torque, which she locked into place with a clinking of metal. 

            She put her finger under Ambrose’ chin and tilted his head back.  “You are my slave girl now.”

            “Is that what turns you on?”  Ambrose said, barely aware of himself, of what he was doing or saying.  “Do you want me to be your slave girl?”

            “Yes.”

            Ambrose giggled.  Knelt back on his heels, his legs together, shoulders back, breasts out, and then in a tiny little voice he said, “How can I please you master?”

            “Good,” Nubia said.  “Yes.  Very good.  Show me that pretty smile.”

            Ambrose smiled. 

            “Get on your hands and knees.”

From my book, Metanoia

I have generally chosen to keep using my character’s original gender pronouns when writing, even after the character has become fully gender changed in body and even sometimes in mind.  I will often alternate them in a passage to represent the character’s shifting sense of self, in a scene like this:

Paul smiled as he slipped out of his bra, letting his breasts sway free.  His wife, Jane, looked at him, letting her eyes drop from his face to his breasts, and Paul felt his cheeks flush as he glanced down bashfully.  “You’re such a beautiful girl,”  Jane said in her deep, husky voice.   Paul giggled.  He felt so sexy.  Jane lifted his chin and kissed him, then pushed him onto his back and slid her hand down his belly, to the slit between his legs.

Paul gasped as she felt her wife’s fingers slip into her vagina; she arched her back and ran his fingers through his thick, curly hair while Jane put his mouth on one of her nipples and began to suck, and Paul knew he was his wife’s woman now, and he always would be.

One reason I started to keep the pronouns is because I often felt when I read longer works of TG fiction– or saw some movies– that it would often become irrelevant that the characters was gender swapped.  I would essentially forget I was reading or watching a story about a man trapped in a woman’s body.  Especially in cases where the character adjusts, it would usually seem more and more that I was not watching a movie about a man who was turned into a woman at all, but just a movie where an actress started off doing a poor impression of a man and then started to just be herself.

In books, scenes that often seemed very charged for me as a fan of TG fiction when written with male pronouns would become boring with body consistent pronouns, and more so still if the name was also changed.

Paul grabbed his purse and slipped it over his shoulder, pausing to check his make-up

versus

Paulina grabbed her purse and slipped it over her shoulder, pausing to check her make-up

For me, the first sentence is fun as I feel the conflict is embedded in the writing via the use of the male pronouns, whereas the second I will read as just a sentence, or more so a sentence, especially if the pronouns and names switched 100 pages ago.

The essence of drama is conflict, and I want to keep my characters in conflict right up until the very end, where I often will completely switch the pronouns if I want my character to happily accept his new gender.

One of the first scenes I remember reading where this was done to incredible effect was in the first book in the Hot Bloods anthology series.  I can’t seem to find my copy, but the story was by Graham Masterson, and in it the main character wakes up in the body of a super hot woman he has been having an affair with, and when he explores his new body we get a line like, “He reached down and put his hands on his vulva, and then gingerly slipped a finger into his vagina.”

I remember finding that line incredibly impactful in the mixing of male gender words with female anatomy, and I have been drawn to those kinds of sex-scenes ever since.

Of course, we can all do what we want, and I am not trying to tell anyone else how to write. I just personally chose to keep using male or female pronouns even after characters switch for the reasons listed above.  I also tend to write stories about people who are not TG who get switched, so it makes sense in my stories that there is a conflict, whereas many people write stories of discovery where the character is female to begin with but just has the wrong body.

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He, She and TG

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