He, She and TG

 

 

       Nubia lifted the bottle higher, and some of the dark red wine spilled from the corners of Ambrose mouth and dripped onto his breasts. He swallowed and burst into giggles, falling onto his back again, staring up at the spinning ceiling.  Nubia licked the wine off his soft breasts, then wiped them with the corner of the sheets they lay upon, then looking down at Ambrose’ pretty face, his cloudy, drunken eyes, she said, “Opium!”

            “No,”  Ambrose said.  “I can’t even sit up right now…”

            But then Nubia was sitting him up, and she took a toke of opium and then covered his lips with her own, blowing the smoke into his mouth.  Ambrose inhaled, the world had gone bleary, and he slurred, “I love you so much. By the gods just take me.  Take me now.”

            “Let’s play a game,”  Nubia said, stroking his soft cheek.  “Something different.”  She draped her silken top over his breasts, the top she wore as his slave girl.

            “No,”  Ambrose said, his voice rising into a girlish whine.  “Let’s just make looooove!”

            “For me.  Wear this.  Come on now.”

            “Oh, fine then.  Just hurry.”  Nubia fitted the little silk top over her master’s breasts, tying to strings behind his slender neck, then the panties, the pantaloons, and finally the glittering golden torque, which she locked into place with a clinking of metal. 

            She put her finger under Ambrose’ chin and tilted his head back.  “You are my slave girl now.”

            “Is that what turns you on?”  Ambrose said, barely aware of himself, of what he was doing or saying.  “Do you want me to be your slave girl?”

            “Yes.”

            Ambrose giggled.  Knelt back on his heels, his legs together, shoulders back, breasts out, and then in a tiny little voice he said, “How can I please you master?”

            “Good,” Nubia said.  “Yes.  Very good.  Show me that pretty smile.”

            Ambrose smiled. 

            “Get on your hands and knees.”

From my book, Metanoia

I have generally chosen to keep using my character’s original gender pronouns when writing, even after the character has become fully gender changed in body and even sometimes in mind.  I will often alternate them in a passage to represent the character’s shifting sense of self, in a scene like this:

Paul smiled as he slipped out of his bra, letting his breasts sway free.  His wife, Jane, looked at him, letting her eyes drop from his face to his breasts, and Paul felt his cheeks flush as he glanced down bashfully.  “You’re such a beautiful girl,”  Jane said in her deep, husky voice.   Paul giggled.  He felt so sexy.  Jane lifted his chin and kissed him, then pushed him onto his back and slid her hand down his belly, to the slit between his legs.

Paul gasped as she felt her wife’s fingers slip into her vagina; she arched her back and ran his fingers through his thick, curly hair while Jane put his mouth on one of her nipples and began to suck, and Paul knew he was his wife’s woman now, and he always would be.

One reason I started to keep the pronouns is because I often felt when I read longer works of TG fiction– or saw some movies– that it would often become irrelevant that the characters was gender swapped.  I would essentially forget I was reading or watching a story about a man trapped in a woman’s body.  Especially in cases where the character adjusts, it would usually seem more and more that I was not watching a movie about a man who was turned into a woman at all, but just a movie where an actress started off doing a poor impression of a man and then started to just be herself.

In books, scenes that often seemed very charged for me as a fan of TG fiction when written with male pronouns would become boring with body consistent pronouns, and more so still if the name was also changed.

Paul grabbed his purse and slipped it over his shoulder, pausing to check his make-up

versus

Paulina grabbed her purse and slipped it over her shoulder, pausing to check her make-up

For me, the first sentence is fun as I feel the conflict is embedded in the writing via the use of the male pronouns, whereas the second I will read as just a sentence, or more so a sentence, especially if the pronouns and names switched 100 pages ago.

The essence of drama is conflict, and I want to keep my characters in conflict right up until the very end, where I often will completely switch the pronouns if I want my character to happily accept his new gender.

One of the first scenes I remember reading where this was done to incredible effect was in the first book in the Hot Bloods anthology series.  I can’t seem to find my copy, but the story was by Graham Masterson, and in it the main character wakes up in the body of a super hot woman he has been having an affair with, and when he explores his new body we get a line like, “He reached down and put his hands on his vulva, and then gingerly slipped a finger into his vagina.”

I remember finding that line incredibly impactful in the mixing of male gender words with female anatomy, and I have been drawn to those kinds of sex-scenes ever since.

Of course, we can all do what we want, and I am not trying to tell anyone else how to write. I just personally chose to keep using male or female pronouns even after characters switch for the reasons listed above.  I also tend to write stories about people who are not TG who get switched, so it makes sense in my stories that there is a conflict, whereas many people write stories of discovery where the character is female to begin with but just has the wrong body.

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He, She and TG

5 Questions with Lyka Bloom

lykabloom

Hey, readers!  Today I am extremely happy to share with you my interview with one of my favorite TG writers, Lyka Bloom!

 

  1. What are your top three TG experiences in terms of books, films, videos, songs?

It’s hard to remember now where the interest came from.  I was always fascinated by mental and physical manipulation of one form or another.  There’s a Clive Barker story called The Madonna Pool that was one of the first memories I have of reading gender transformation and really responding to it.  For some reason, Saturday morning cartoons seemed to be littered with gender change storylines, and I always found those viscerally attractive to me.  I know I am being vague, but it’s hard to point to a single thing, or even three things, that were formative.  Lately, I can point to certain books others have done.  I loved Pinsedo by Tom Tame, and I thought Allmyth was really wonderful, too.

  1. Why does the theme of TG interest you as an artist?

I think like science fiction at its best, the TG world allows you to do morality plays and also examine a real issue beneath the obvious real-world TG issues.  You can do crime-and-punishment stories in a way that has a sexy edge, and who doesn’t like a little sexiness in their lives?

Also, the idea of becoming something that you were not before appeals to me.  I think there’s a long-standing taboo regarding men expressing femininity, so I like to play with those ideas.  For some of my characters, the idea is repulsive while others hurtle towards it.  Sometimes it is a punishment, but that leads to the idea of how you can punish someone who is no longer the person they were.  I think my work tends to be a softer branch of the genre, where I introduce some optimism amid the changing bodies and minds.

We live in a time now when gender fluidity is more acceptable, and playing with the variations of the masculine and feminine, whether that’s shemale or futa or what have you, is fun as a writer.  You can explore the notion of attraction – what’s sexy now?  Is it the buxom woman or the slender man, is it the muscular, tall woman or the man with long hair and a hint of makeup?   Honestly, one of the biggest challenges is keeping up with how culture is changing.  As much bigotry and sexism exists, there is a surprising acceptance and tolerance for LGBT issues, and that’s really refreshing to see.  I think more people are open to the kinds of work I do and other authors in the genre do.  It’s come out of the closet, so to speak.

  1. TG fiction is very category driven.  What types of TG fiction are you most drawn to writing?  Why?

I really like the magical and mythological TG fiction.  I’ve always been attracted to the discordance in the male mind in the feminine body and so forth, so much of my fiction has to do with the man being conditioned into womanhood.  There’s an element of reluctance to it, but I don’t generally do humiliation in the stories, which is a theme I see running through a lot of the TG fiction.  I suppose I’m enough of a romantic to want a happy ending for most of my characters.  Even if they are fundamentally changed by the end of the story, the characters tend to be left happy.

I’m intrigued by the humiliation/sissy stories, but I’ve never been able to successfully write one.  Halfway through, I end up finding a way to make the characters find the upside in things. Sometimes I wish I was crueler, because some of that work is fantastic!  Ann Michelle, in particular, I enjoy for her feminization stories, and Kylie Gable does fantastic stuff there, too.

For me, I like to be more Cinemax than XXX, though I do like to get naughtier now and then but I think real affection between the characters finds its way in, whether I want it to or not.

  1. Can you talk about your journey as an artist?  Who were your influences? What was the process like for you in terms of reaching the point where you felt ready to put your work out there for the world to see?

My mainstream influences were Stephen King and Clive Barker, because I loved horror novels for most of my childhood.  I think King, in particular, has an eye for subtle detail that really grounds the stories of the fantastic in reality, and I still love that.  I try to do a hint of that in my work, but only a reader can say if I have any success in that arena.

I’ve written in one form or another for years and years, but I think the moment when I was ready to publish my work came when I was reading some of the stories available in this genre.  Yes, I’m a fan, too.  Without being overly critical, it really was a case of reading something and thinking I could do better, or at least no worse.  And then I read some truly impressive pieces and I realized that, yes, there is an element of the erotic in these stories, but there’s also real work being done to make interesting characters and to explore the nature of gender identity and sexual identity.  I put out a couple of stories to see if anyone was interested and they did quite well.  That really gave me the confidence to start producing more, and to play with expectations a little, too.  While the vast majority of my work is in the TG realm, I step outside of it to do some other things, including some horror erotica that is definitely influenced by my early reading.

What has surprised me most about starting and having been writing in this genre for several years now is the loyalty of the readers and the creativity that they express, too.  I started a Patreon thing so that readers could contribute and, in exchange, I would develop as try based around their ideas.  So, stories like the “Muffy the Demon Slayer” tale and “Casino of Change” are ideas that came from readers (I hesitate to call them fans, it sounds immodest to me) who were kind enough to offer a contribution in exchange for entrusting me with a story they would like to see.  It’s really fired my imagination, too, and I think I’m doing more diverse things now than I’ve ever done.

  1. What has been the most positive aspect of publishing your work?

I get the occasional email from a reader that will tell me how much they enjoyed a particular story, and that’s an unbelievable thrill!  I think the nature of doing erotica is that most readers tend to feel secretive about their reading experiences;  When someone reaches out, it’s very flattering, because it implies that that person is coming out of the shadows a bit to say that a particular story pleased them.  It’s very satisfying.

I’ve also had authors tell me that they were inspired to do their own stories after reading mine.  I try to be as much of a force of positivity as I can be, and I encourage every reader to write their own fantasies at one time or another, even if they never publish it.  The TG community has been too long dismissed, and knowing that there is this community of readers who find TG fantasy fiction enjoyable makes all of us less alone.

  1. What’s coming up next?  Let’s hear about your next projects!

I try to do about a story a week.  Left to my own devices, I can be terribly lazy so I try to keep a consistent schedule to stay productive, otherwise I’d only do a story every couple of months.

The next four or five will be a continuation of the Corporate Takeover series, the conclusion to the Stable Games pony-girl stories, a new Pink Institute story and a sequel to Muffy the Demon Slayer, in no particular order.  Plus, I do a free short-short every month on the website (LykaBloom.com to be shameless for a moment).  And then, who knows?  But something spicy, I’m sure!

 

5 Questions with Lyka Bloom